Magnetic resonance measurements of flow-path enhancement during supercritical CO2 injection in sandstone and carbonate rock cores

Sarah Vogt, C.A. Shaw, J.E. Maneval, T.I. Brox, M.L. Skidmore, S.L. Codd, J.D. Seymour

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    © 2014 Elsevier B.V. Sandstone and carbonate core samples were challenged with a two-phase supercritical CO2 and brine mixture to investigate the effects of chemical processes on the physical properties of these rocks during injection of CO2. The experiments were monitored in real-time for pressure, temperature, and volumetric rate discharge. Pore geometry and connectivity were characterized before and after each experimental challenge using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and two-dimensional MR relaxation correlations. Quartz arenite sandstone cores were largely unaffected by the challenge with no measurable change in effective permeability at moderate and high temperatures (~50°C and ~95°C) or brine concentrations (~1g/L and ~10g/L). In contrast, a carbonate core sample showed evidence of significant dissolution leading to a six-fold increase in effective permeability. MR images and relaxation measurements revealed a marked increase in the volume and connectivity of pre-existing pore networks in the carbonate core. We infer that the increase in permeability in the carbonate core was enhanced by focused dissolution in the existing pore and fracture networks that enhanced fast-flow paths through the core.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)507-514
    JournalJournal of Petroleum Science and Engineering
    Volume122
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

    Magnetic resonance measurement
    Sandstone
    carbonate rock
    Carbonates
    Magnetic resonance
    Rocks
    sandstone
    carbonate
    Core samples
    permeability
    brine
    connectivity
    Dissolution
    dissolution
    arenite
    fracture network
    chemical process
    Quartz
    Physical properties
    physical property

    Cite this

    Vogt, Sarah ; Shaw, C.A. ; Maneval, J.E. ; Brox, T.I. ; Skidmore, M.L. ; Codd, S.L. ; Seymour, J.D. / Magnetic resonance measurements of flow-path enhancement during supercritical CO2 injection in sandstone and carbonate rock cores. In: Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering. 2014 ; Vol. 122. pp. 507-514.
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    Magnetic resonance measurements of flow-path enhancement during supercritical CO2 injection in sandstone and carbonate rock cores. / Vogt, Sarah; Shaw, C.A.; Maneval, J.E.; Brox, T.I.; Skidmore, M.L.; Codd, S.L.; Seymour, J.D.

    In: Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering, Vol. 122, 2014, p. 507-514.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Magnetic resonance measurements of flow-path enhancement during supercritical CO2 injection in sandstone and carbonate rock cores

    AU - Vogt, Sarah

    AU - Shaw, C.A.

    AU - Maneval, J.E.

    AU - Brox, T.I.

    AU - Skidmore, M.L.

    AU - Codd, S.L.

    AU - Seymour, J.D.

    PY - 2014

    Y1 - 2014

    N2 - © 2014 Elsevier B.V. Sandstone and carbonate core samples were challenged with a two-phase supercritical CO2 and brine mixture to investigate the effects of chemical processes on the physical properties of these rocks during injection of CO2. The experiments were monitored in real-time for pressure, temperature, and volumetric rate discharge. Pore geometry and connectivity were characterized before and after each experimental challenge using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and two-dimensional MR relaxation correlations. Quartz arenite sandstone cores were largely unaffected by the challenge with no measurable change in effective permeability at moderate and high temperatures (~50°C and ~95°C) or brine concentrations (~1g/L and ~10g/L). In contrast, a carbonate core sample showed evidence of significant dissolution leading to a six-fold increase in effective permeability. MR images and relaxation measurements revealed a marked increase in the volume and connectivity of pre-existing pore networks in the carbonate core. We infer that the increase in permeability in the carbonate core was enhanced by focused dissolution in the existing pore and fracture networks that enhanced fast-flow paths through the core.

    AB - © 2014 Elsevier B.V. Sandstone and carbonate core samples were challenged with a two-phase supercritical CO2 and brine mixture to investigate the effects of chemical processes on the physical properties of these rocks during injection of CO2. The experiments were monitored in real-time for pressure, temperature, and volumetric rate discharge. Pore geometry and connectivity were characterized before and after each experimental challenge using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and two-dimensional MR relaxation correlations. Quartz arenite sandstone cores were largely unaffected by the challenge with no measurable change in effective permeability at moderate and high temperatures (~50°C and ~95°C) or brine concentrations (~1g/L and ~10g/L). In contrast, a carbonate core sample showed evidence of significant dissolution leading to a six-fold increase in effective permeability. MR images and relaxation measurements revealed a marked increase in the volume and connectivity of pre-existing pore networks in the carbonate core. We infer that the increase in permeability in the carbonate core was enhanced by focused dissolution in the existing pore and fracture networks that enhanced fast-flow paths through the core.

    U2 - 10.1016/j.petrol.2014.08.013

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