LPS-induced interferon response networks predict severe lower respiratory infection susceptibility in the first year of life

James Read

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

139 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Severe lower respiratory infections (sLRIs) are a leading cause of infant hospitalisation, and a major risk factor of asthma development. Employing systems biology approaches, this thesis demonstrates that interferon-signaling networks induced at birth by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and not viral-related stimuli, can predict sLRIs in infancy. Further, LPS-induced interferon responses exhibited strong developmental regulation between birth and 5 years. This suggests that early life innate immune responses to bacterial products play a major role in sLRI susceptibility and subsequent asthma development. Accordingly, early-life LPS-induced response patterns represent a novel predictor of at-risk infants and a logical target for drug development.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Bosco, Anthony, Supervisor
  • Strickland, Deborah, Supervisor
  • Holt, Patrick, Supervisor
  • Reinke, Stacey N., Supervisor, External person
  • Kicic, Anthony, Supervisor
  • Martino, David, Supervisor
  • Whitehouse, Andrew, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date25 Jan 2023
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2023

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'LPS-induced interferon response networks predict severe lower respiratory infection susceptibility in the first year of life'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this