Lower serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with colorectal and breast cancer, but not overall cancer risk: a 20-year cohort study

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Abstract

Studies of the relationship between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and cancer risk have been inconsistent. We hypothesized that serum 25(OH)D was associated with total non-skin cancer incidence and mortality, and/or specifically with colorectal, lung, breast or prostate cancer in an Australian cohort. Serum 25(OH)D was measured in 3818 participants (2166 females) in the 1994/1995 Busselton Health Survey aged 25 to 84 years at baseline. Cancer mortality and events over 20 years follow-up were determined by data linkage. The mean serum 25(OH)D concentration was 60.6 ± 18.0 nmol/L, with 28%, 54% and 18% of participants in the lower (<50 nmol/L), middle (50-75 nmol/L) and higher (≥75 nmol/L) vitamin D status groups, respectively. During follow-up (excluding the first 2 years), 212 participants died from non-skin cancer and 634, 110 and 44 participants had non-skin, colorectal and lung cancer events, respectively; 113 women had breast cancer and 122 men had prostate cancer events. For colorectal cancer, lower circulating 25(OH)D was associated with significantly higher risk compared with the middle group (covariate-adjusted HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.04, 2.53). For breast cancer, women with a higher 25(OH)D level had lower risk than women in the middle group (HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.16, 0.89) and the lower group (HR 0.37, 95% CI 0.15, 0.89). Serum 25(OH)D was not associated with overall cancer death or event, or with lung or prostate cancer. In this community-based cohort, lower 25(OH)D levels were associated with increased risk of colorectal and breast cancer, but not overall cancer risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-107
Number of pages8
JournalNutrition Research
Volume67
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2019

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Colorectal Neoplasms
Cohort Studies
Breast Neoplasms
Serum
Lung Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Mortality
Information Storage and Retrieval
Health Surveys
Vitamin D
25-hydroxyvitamin D
Incidence

Cite this

@article{88292fb9cd5f446a8cbd727468eb4075,
title = "Lower serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with colorectal and breast cancer, but not overall cancer risk: a 20-year cohort study",
abstract = "Studies of the relationship between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and cancer risk have been inconsistent. We hypothesized that serum 25(OH)D was associated with total non-skin cancer incidence and mortality, and/or specifically with colorectal, lung, breast or prostate cancer in an Australian cohort. Serum 25(OH)D was measured in 3818 participants (2166 females) in the 1994/1995 Busselton Health Survey aged 25 to 84 years at baseline. Cancer mortality and events over 20 years follow-up were determined by data linkage. The mean serum 25(OH)D concentration was 60.6 ± 18.0 nmol/L, with 28{\%}, 54{\%} and 18{\%} of participants in the lower (<50 nmol/L), middle (50-75 nmol/L) and higher (≥75 nmol/L) vitamin D status groups, respectively. During follow-up (excluding the first 2 years), 212 participants died from non-skin cancer and 634, 110 and 44 participants had non-skin, colorectal and lung cancer events, respectively; 113 women had breast cancer and 122 men had prostate cancer events. For colorectal cancer, lower circulating 25(OH)D was associated with significantly higher risk compared with the middle group (covariate-adjusted HR 1.62, 95{\%} CI 1.04, 2.53). For breast cancer, women with a higher 25(OH)D level had lower risk than women in the middle group (HR 0.38, 95{\%} CI 0.16, 0.89) and the lower group (HR 0.37, 95{\%} CI 0.15, 0.89). Serum 25(OH)D was not associated with overall cancer death or event, or with lung or prostate cancer. In this community-based cohort, lower 25(OH)D levels were associated with increased risk of colorectal and breast cancer, but not overall cancer risk.",
keywords = "25-Hydroxyvitamin D, Breast cancer, Cancer death, Colorectal cancer, Follow-up study, Risk factors",
author = "Kun Zhu and Matthew Knuiman and Mark Divitini and Joseph Hung and Lim, {Ee Mun} and Cooke, {Brian R.} and Walsh, {John P.}",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.nutres.2019.03.010",
language = "English",
volume = "67",
pages = "100--107",
journal = "Nutrition Research",
issn = "0271-5317",
publisher = "Elsevier",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Lower serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with colorectal and breast cancer, but not overall cancer risk

T2 - a 20-year cohort study

AU - Zhu, Kun

AU - Knuiman, Matthew

AU - Divitini, Mark

AU - Hung, Joseph

AU - Lim, Ee Mun

AU - Cooke, Brian R.

AU - Walsh, John P.

PY - 2019/7/1

Y1 - 2019/7/1

N2 - Studies of the relationship between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and cancer risk have been inconsistent. We hypothesized that serum 25(OH)D was associated with total non-skin cancer incidence and mortality, and/or specifically with colorectal, lung, breast or prostate cancer in an Australian cohort. Serum 25(OH)D was measured in 3818 participants (2166 females) in the 1994/1995 Busselton Health Survey aged 25 to 84 years at baseline. Cancer mortality and events over 20 years follow-up were determined by data linkage. The mean serum 25(OH)D concentration was 60.6 ± 18.0 nmol/L, with 28%, 54% and 18% of participants in the lower (<50 nmol/L), middle (50-75 nmol/L) and higher (≥75 nmol/L) vitamin D status groups, respectively. During follow-up (excluding the first 2 years), 212 participants died from non-skin cancer and 634, 110 and 44 participants had non-skin, colorectal and lung cancer events, respectively; 113 women had breast cancer and 122 men had prostate cancer events. For colorectal cancer, lower circulating 25(OH)D was associated with significantly higher risk compared with the middle group (covariate-adjusted HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.04, 2.53). For breast cancer, women with a higher 25(OH)D level had lower risk than women in the middle group (HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.16, 0.89) and the lower group (HR 0.37, 95% CI 0.15, 0.89). Serum 25(OH)D was not associated with overall cancer death or event, or with lung or prostate cancer. In this community-based cohort, lower 25(OH)D levels were associated with increased risk of colorectal and breast cancer, but not overall cancer risk.

AB - Studies of the relationship between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and cancer risk have been inconsistent. We hypothesized that serum 25(OH)D was associated with total non-skin cancer incidence and mortality, and/or specifically with colorectal, lung, breast or prostate cancer in an Australian cohort. Serum 25(OH)D was measured in 3818 participants (2166 females) in the 1994/1995 Busselton Health Survey aged 25 to 84 years at baseline. Cancer mortality and events over 20 years follow-up were determined by data linkage. The mean serum 25(OH)D concentration was 60.6 ± 18.0 nmol/L, with 28%, 54% and 18% of participants in the lower (<50 nmol/L), middle (50-75 nmol/L) and higher (≥75 nmol/L) vitamin D status groups, respectively. During follow-up (excluding the first 2 years), 212 participants died from non-skin cancer and 634, 110 and 44 participants had non-skin, colorectal and lung cancer events, respectively; 113 women had breast cancer and 122 men had prostate cancer events. For colorectal cancer, lower circulating 25(OH)D was associated with significantly higher risk compared with the middle group (covariate-adjusted HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.04, 2.53). For breast cancer, women with a higher 25(OH)D level had lower risk than women in the middle group (HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.16, 0.89) and the lower group (HR 0.37, 95% CI 0.15, 0.89). Serum 25(OH)D was not associated with overall cancer death or event, or with lung or prostate cancer. In this community-based cohort, lower 25(OH)D levels were associated with increased risk of colorectal and breast cancer, but not overall cancer risk.

KW - 25-Hydroxyvitamin D

KW - Breast cancer

KW - Cancer death

KW - Colorectal cancer

KW - Follow-up study

KW - Risk factors

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U2 - 10.1016/j.nutres.2019.03.010

DO - 10.1016/j.nutres.2019.03.010

M3 - Article

VL - 67

SP - 100

EP - 107

JO - Nutrition Research

JF - Nutrition Research

SN - 0271-5317

ER -