Low-frequency rotational isolator for airborne exploration

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We have determined the performance of a passive rotational vibration isolator for a time-domain airborne electromagnetic (TDEM) receiver. The isolator uses neutrally buoyant flotation to provide very soft suspension and a very low resonant frequency of 0.065 Hz +/- 0.005 Hz. One of the limitations of mapping deeper targets in areas of conductive overburden with TDEM systems is that low-frequency coilvibration noise provides a lower bound to the transmitter base frequency (typically limited to 25 Hz). The purpose of this new isolator is to improve coil vibration related noise between 5 and 20 Hz to allow the transmitter base frequency to be reduced. A fixed-wing flight test determined that a receiver inside the new isolator had five times less rotational noise at 10 Hz than a current commercial system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E27-E30
Number of pages4
JournalGeophysics
Volume82
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Cite this

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title = "Low-frequency rotational isolator for airborne exploration",
abstract = "We have determined the performance of a passive rotational vibration isolator for a time-domain airborne electromagnetic (TDEM) receiver. The isolator uses neutrally buoyant flotation to provide very soft suspension and a very low resonant frequency of 0.065 Hz +/- 0.005 Hz. One of the limitations of mapping deeper targets in areas of conductive overburden with TDEM systems is that low-frequency coilvibration noise provides a lower bound to the transmitter base frequency (typically limited to 25 Hz). The purpose of this new isolator is to improve coil vibration related noise between 5 and 20 Hz to allow the transmitter base frequency to be reduced. A fixed-wing flight test determined that a receiver inside the new isolator had five times less rotational noise at 10 Hz than a current commercial system.",
author = "Andrew Sunderland and Ray Lockwood and Li Ju and Blair, {David G.}",
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language = "English",
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Low-frequency rotational isolator for airborne exploration. / Sunderland, Andrew; Lockwood, Ray; Ju, Li; Blair, David G.

In: Geophysics, Vol. 82, No. 2, 2017, p. E27-E30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Low-frequency rotational isolator for airborne exploration

AU - Sunderland, Andrew

AU - Lockwood, Ray

AU - Ju, Li

AU - Blair, David G.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - We have determined the performance of a passive rotational vibration isolator for a time-domain airborne electromagnetic (TDEM) receiver. The isolator uses neutrally buoyant flotation to provide very soft suspension and a very low resonant frequency of 0.065 Hz +/- 0.005 Hz. One of the limitations of mapping deeper targets in areas of conductive overburden with TDEM systems is that low-frequency coilvibration noise provides a lower bound to the transmitter base frequency (typically limited to 25 Hz). The purpose of this new isolator is to improve coil vibration related noise between 5 and 20 Hz to allow the transmitter base frequency to be reduced. A fixed-wing flight test determined that a receiver inside the new isolator had five times less rotational noise at 10 Hz than a current commercial system.

AB - We have determined the performance of a passive rotational vibration isolator for a time-domain airborne electromagnetic (TDEM) receiver. The isolator uses neutrally buoyant flotation to provide very soft suspension and a very low resonant frequency of 0.065 Hz +/- 0.005 Hz. One of the limitations of mapping deeper targets in areas of conductive overburden with TDEM systems is that low-frequency coilvibration noise provides a lower bound to the transmitter base frequency (typically limited to 25 Hz). The purpose of this new isolator is to improve coil vibration related noise between 5 and 20 Hz to allow the transmitter base frequency to be reduced. A fixed-wing flight test determined that a receiver inside the new isolator had five times less rotational noise at 10 Hz than a current commercial system.

U2 - 10.1190/GEO2015-0521.1

DO - 10.1190/GEO2015-0521.1

M3 - Article

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SP - E27-E30

JO - Geophysics

JF - Geophysics

SN - 0016-8033

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ER -