Low-concentration atropine eyedrops for myopia control in a multi-racial cohort of Australian children: A randomised clinical trial

Samantha Sze-Yee Lee, Gareth Lingham, Magdalena Blaszkowska, Paul G. Sanfilippo, Adrian Koay, Maria Franchina, Audrey Chia, James Loughman, Daniel Ian Flitcroft, Christopher J. Hammond, Augusto Azuara-Blanco, Julie M. Crewe, Antony Clark, David A. Mackey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background To test the hypothesis that 0.01% atropine eyedrops are a safe and effective myopia-control approach in Australian children. Methods Children (6-16 years; 49% Europeans, 18% East Asian, 22% South Asian, and 12% other/mixed ancestry) with documented myopia progression were enrolled into this single-centre randomised, parallel, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial and randomised to receive 0.01% atropine (n = 104) or placebo (n = 49) eyedrops (2:1 ratio) instilled nightly over 24 months (mean index age = 12.2 +/- 2.5 and 11.2 +/- 2.8 years, respectively). Outcome measures were the changes in spherical equivalent (SE) and axial length (AL) from baseline. Results At 12 months, the mean SE and AL change from baseline were -0.31D (95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.39 to -0.22) and 0.16 mm (95%CI = 0.13-0.20) in the atropine group and -0.53D (95%CI = -0.66 to -0.40) and 0.25 mm (95%CI = 0.20-0.30) in the placebo group (group difference p

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages12
JournalClinical and Experimental Ophthalmology
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Sep 2022

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