Looking for symmetry: Fixational eye movements are biased by image mirror symmetry

Andrew Isaac Meso, A. Montagnini, Jason Bell, G.S. Masson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2016 the American Physiological Society.
Humans are highly sensitive to symmetry. During scene exploration, the area of the retina with dense light receptor coverage acquires most information from relevant locations determined by gaze fixation. We characterized patterns of fixational eye movements made by observers staring at synthetic scenes either freely (i.e., free exploration) or during a symmetry orientation discrimination task (i.e., active exploration). Stimuli could be mirror-symmetric or not. Both free and active exploration generated more saccades parallel to the axis of symmetry than along other orientations. Most saccades were small (
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1250-1260
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neurophysiology
Volume116
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sept 2016

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