Longitudinal variations in availability and disposability of specific makes and models of hot products associated with variations in corresponding stealing counts

Liam Quinn, Joe Clare

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Consistent with the crime drop experienced in many ‘Western’ market-based countries since the early 1990s, burglary and other theft offences in Western Australia have declined dramatically over the past two decades. To date, the most parsimonious explanation for these sustained international declines has focused on the changing nature of risk and effort involved with acquisitive crime resulting from increased security. This article presents data that supports the argument for a parallel and compatible factor that has reduced these crimes: the reduction in reward from property crime. It is argued that variations in availability and disposability of hot products can account for longitudinal variations in stealing counts of specific goods. To test this hypothesis, a series of correlational and cross-sectional regression analyses are conducted on the declining availability of cash and changing desirability of specific makes and models of gaming consoles with their corresponding stealing counts between 2007 and 2019 in Western Australia. The findings demonstrate significant product-specific associations between the availability (cash) and disposability (consoles) with their corresponding stealing counts. The theoretical and applied implications of these findings are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)517-535
Number of pages19
JournalCurrent Issues in Criminal Justice
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

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