Longitudinal effects of caregiving on parental well-being: the example of Rett syndrome, a severe neurological disorder

Yuka Mori, Jenny Downs, Kingsley Wong, Helen Leonard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Little longitudinal research has examined parental well-being in those with a child with specific genetic developmental disorder although the associated severe neurological impairments and multiple physical comorbidities likely place substantial burden of caregiving on the parent. We aimed to examine longitudinally the well-being of parents of individuals included in the Australian Rett Syndrome Database over the period from 2002 to 2011 using the Short Form 12 Health Survey. Residential remoteness, the child being a teenager at baseline, having frequent sleep disturbances or behavioural problems, and the type of MECP2 gene mutation were each associated with later poorer parental physical well-being scores. Being a single parent or on a low income was also associated with later poorer physical well-being, while the child having enteral feeding was associated with later poorer emotional well-being. Both the physical and emotional well-being of the parent improved if the child was living in out-of-home care. Our findings suggest that some opportunities do exist for clinicians to help optimise parental well-being. Being alert to the possibility and need for management of a child’s sleep or emotional disturbance is important as is awareness of the additional likely parental burden as the child moves through adolescence into early adulthood and their need for additional support at that time. However, the findings also highlight the complex nature of parental well-being over time in parents of children with a severe neurological disorder and how they may be affected by a range of inter-related family and child factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)505-520
Number of pages16
JournalEuropean Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume28
Issue number4
Early online date27 Aug 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2019

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Rett Syndrome
Nervous System Diseases
Sleep
Parents
Single Parent
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Affective Symptoms
Enteral Nutrition
Home Care Services
Health Surveys
Child Welfare
Comorbidity
Databases
Mutation
Research

Cite this

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title = "Longitudinal effects of caregiving on parental well-being: the example of Rett syndrome, a severe neurological disorder",
abstract = "Little longitudinal research has examined parental well-being in those with a child with specific genetic developmental disorder although the associated severe neurological impairments and multiple physical comorbidities likely place substantial burden of caregiving on the parent. We aimed to examine longitudinally the well-being of parents of individuals included in the Australian Rett Syndrome Database over the period from 2002 to 2011 using the Short Form 12 Health Survey. Residential remoteness, the child being a teenager at baseline, having frequent sleep disturbances or behavioural problems, and the type of MECP2 gene mutation were each associated with later poorer parental physical well-being scores. Being a single parent or on a low income was also associated with later poorer physical well-being, while the child having enteral feeding was associated with later poorer emotional well-being. Both the physical and emotional well-being of the parent improved if the child was living in out-of-home care. Our findings suggest that some opportunities do exist for clinicians to help optimise parental well-being. Being alert to the possibility and need for management of a child’s sleep or emotional disturbance is important as is awareness of the additional likely parental burden as the child moves through adolescence into early adulthood and their need for additional support at that time. However, the findings also highlight the complex nature of parental well-being over time in parents of children with a severe neurological disorder and how they may be affected by a range of inter-related family and child factors.",
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