Longitudinal characterization of nasopharyngeal colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae in a South African birth cohort post 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine implementation

Felix S. Dube, Jordache Ramjith, Sugnet Gardner-Lubbe, Polite Nduru, F. J.Lourens Robberts, Nicole Wolter, Heather J. Zar, Mark P. Nicol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Monitoring changes in pneumococcal carriage is key to understanding vaccination-induced shifts in the ecology of carriage and impact on health. We longitudinally investigated pneumococcal carriage dynamics in infants. Pneumococcal isolates were obtained from nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs collected 2-weekly from 137 infants enrolled from birth through their first year of life. Pneumococci were serotyped by sequetyping, confirmed by Quellung. Pneumococci were isolated from 54% (1809/3331) of infants. Median time to first acquisition was 63 days. Serotype-specific acquisition rates ranged from 0.01 to 0.88 events/child-year and did not differ between PCV13 and non-PCV13 serotypes (0.11 events/child-year [95% CI 0.07–0.18] vs. 0.11 events/child-year [95% CI 0.06–0.18]). There was no difference in carriage duration between individual PCV13 and non-PCV13 serotypes (40.6 days [95% CI 31.9–49.4] vs. 38.6 days [95% CI 35.1–42.1]), however cumulatively the duration of carriage of non-PCV13 serotypes was greater than PCV13 serotypes (141.2 days (95% CI 126.6–155.8) vs. 30.7 days (95% CI 22.3–39.0). Frequently carried PCV13 serotypes included 19F, 9V, 19A and 6A, while non-PCV13 serotypes included 15B/15C, 21, 10A, 16F, 35B, 9N and 15A. Despite high immunization coverage in our setting, PCV13 serotypes remain in circulation in this cohort, comprising 22% of isolates. Individual PCV13 serotypes were acquired, on average, at equivalent rate to non-PCV13 serotypes, and carried for a similar duration, although the most common non-PCV13 serotypes were more frequently acquired than PCV13 serotypes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number12497
JournalScientific Reports
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Longitudinal characterization of nasopharyngeal colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae in a South African birth cohort post 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine implementation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this