Long-term follow-up of gastric histology after Helicobacter pylori eradication

Geoffrey M. Forbes, J. Robin Warren, Mark E. Glaser, Digby J.E. Cullen, Barry J. Marshall, Brendan J. Collins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

110 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Helicobacter pylori causes chronic active gastritis and is thought to be associated with the development of gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia and carcinoma. As the effect of H. pylori eradication on this process is poorly understood, we sought to determine the long-term effects of H. pylori eradication on gastric histology. Fifty-four patients with duodenal ulceration associated with H. pylori infection received H. pylori eradication therapy in 1985/86 and either remained infected (n = 22) or had the infection eradicated (n = 32); patients were followed up by endoscopy with gastric antral biopsy for 7.1 years (mean). Histopathological analysis of gastric antral mucosa from patients rendered H. pylori-negative revealed a marked decrease in both inflammatory cells within the lamina propria and intraepithelial neutrophils and an increase in epithelial mucinogenesis. Gland atrophy remained unchanged in both H. pylori-positive and -negative patients. When examined for the presence and severity of intestinal metaplasia, there was neither a difference between the two patient groups nor a change with time. These data demonstrate that significant long-term improvements in gastric histology accompany H. pylori eradication when compared with histology in patients with persistent infection. Whether this confers a protective effect by reducing the risk of gastric carcinoma remains unknown.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)670-673
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia)
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

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