Localised hydrodynamics influence vulnerability of coral communities to environmental disturbances

George Shedrawi, James L. Falter, Kim J. Friedman, Ryan J. Lowe, Morgan S. Pratchett, Christopher J. Simpson, Conrad W. Speed, Shaun K. Wilson, Zhenlin Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The movement of water can have a significant influence on the vulnerability of hermatypic corals to environmental disturbances such as cyclone damage, heat stress and anoxia. Here, we explore the relationship between small reef-scale water circulation patterns and measured differences in the abundance, composition and vulnerability of coral assemblages over decades. Changes in coral cover and community structure within Bill’s Bay (Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia) over a 22-yr period, during which multiple disturbance events (including mass bleaching, anoxia, and tropical cyclones) have impacted the area, were compared with spatial variation in water residence times (WRT). We found that reef sites associated with longer water residence times (WRT >15 h) experienced higher rates of coral mortality during acute environmental disturbances compared to reef sites with shorter WRT. Shifts in coral community composition from acroporid to faviid-dominated assemblages were also more prominent at sites with long WRT compared to reef sites with shorter WRT, although shifts in community composition were also observed at sites close to shore. Interestingly, these same long-WRT sites also tended to have the fastest recovery rates so that coral cover was returned to original levels of approximately 20% over two decades. This study provides empirical evidence that spatial patterns in water circulation and flushing can influence the resilience of coral communities, thus identifying areas sensitive to emerging threats associated with global climate change.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)861-872
Number of pages12
JournalCoral Reefs
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2017

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environmental disturbance
hydrodynamics
corals
coral
vulnerability
residence time
reefs
reef
water
water flow
anoxia
hypoxia
community composition
hurricanes
bleaching
Western Australia
heat stress
spatial variation
community structure
flushing

Cite this

Shedrawi, George ; Falter, James L. ; Friedman, Kim J. ; Lowe, Ryan J. ; Pratchett, Morgan S. ; Simpson, Christopher J. ; Speed, Conrad W. ; Wilson, Shaun K. ; Zhang, Zhenlin. / Localised hydrodynamics influence vulnerability of coral communities to environmental disturbances. In: Coral Reefs. 2017 ; Vol. 36, No. 3. pp. 861-872.
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Localised hydrodynamics influence vulnerability of coral communities to environmental disturbances. / Shedrawi, George; Falter, James L.; Friedman, Kim J.; Lowe, Ryan J.; Pratchett, Morgan S.; Simpson, Christopher J.; Speed, Conrad W.; Wilson, Shaun K.; Zhang, Zhenlin.

In: Coral Reefs, Vol. 36, No. 3, 09.2017, p. 861-872.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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