Liquor landscapes: Does access to alcohol outlets influence alcohol consumption in young adults?

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Abstract

Few longitudinal studies have examined the impact of liquor licences on alcohol consumption, and none in young adults, the life stage when alcohol intake is at its highest. We examined associations between liquor licences (i.e., general licences, on-premise licences, liquor stores, and club licences) and alcohol consumption at 20-years (n=988) and 22-years (n=893), and whether changes in the licences between time-points influenced alcohol consumption (n=665). Only general licences were associated with alcohol consumption at 20-years (p=0.037), but by 22-years, all licences types were positively associated with alcohol consumption (p<0.05). Longitudinal analyses showed that for each increase in liquor stores over time, alcohol consumption increased by 1.22 g/day or 8% (p=0.030), and for each additional club licence, consumption increased by 0.90 g/day or 6% (p=0.007). Limiting liquor licences could contribute to a reduction in young adults’ alcohol intake.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-23
Number of pages7
JournalHealth and Place
Volume45
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2017

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Licensure
alcohol consumption
license
Alcohol Drinking
young adult
Young Adult
alcohol
Alcohols
club
consumption
young
Longitudinal Studies
longitudinal study

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title = "Liquor landscapes: Does access to alcohol outlets influence alcohol consumption in young adults?",
abstract = "Few longitudinal studies have examined the impact of liquor licences on alcohol consumption, and none in young adults, the life stage when alcohol intake is at its highest. We examined associations between liquor licences (i.e., general licences, on-premise licences, liquor stores, and club licences) and alcohol consumption at 20-years (n=988) and 22-years (n=893), and whether changes in the licences between time-points influenced alcohol consumption (n=665). Only general licences were associated with alcohol consumption at 20-years (p=0.037), but by 22-years, all licences types were positively associated with alcohol consumption (p<0.05). Longitudinal analyses showed that for each increase in liquor stores over time, alcohol consumption increased by 1.22 g/day or 8{\%} (p=0.030), and for each additional club licence, consumption increased by 0.90 g/day or 6{\%} (p=0.007). Limiting liquor licences could contribute to a reduction in young adults’ alcohol intake.",
keywords = "Alcohol, Alcohol outlet density, Licence types, Longitudinal, Neighbourhood, Young adults",
author = "Sarah Foster and Georgina Trapp and Paula Hooper and Oddy, {Wendy H.} and Lisa Wood and Matthew Knuiman",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
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volume = "45",
pages = "17--23",
journal = "Health & Place",
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publisher = "Elsevier",

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TY - JOUR

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T2 - Does access to alcohol outlets influence alcohol consumption in young adults?

AU - Foster, Sarah

AU - Trapp, Georgina

AU - Hooper, Paula

AU - Oddy, Wendy H.

AU - Wood, Lisa

AU - Knuiman, Matthew

PY - 2017/5/1

Y1 - 2017/5/1

N2 - Few longitudinal studies have examined the impact of liquor licences on alcohol consumption, and none in young adults, the life stage when alcohol intake is at its highest. We examined associations between liquor licences (i.e., general licences, on-premise licences, liquor stores, and club licences) and alcohol consumption at 20-years (n=988) and 22-years (n=893), and whether changes in the licences between time-points influenced alcohol consumption (n=665). Only general licences were associated with alcohol consumption at 20-years (p=0.037), but by 22-years, all licences types were positively associated with alcohol consumption (p<0.05). Longitudinal analyses showed that for each increase in liquor stores over time, alcohol consumption increased by 1.22 g/day or 8% (p=0.030), and for each additional club licence, consumption increased by 0.90 g/day or 6% (p=0.007). Limiting liquor licences could contribute to a reduction in young adults’ alcohol intake.

AB - Few longitudinal studies have examined the impact of liquor licences on alcohol consumption, and none in young adults, the life stage when alcohol intake is at its highest. We examined associations between liquor licences (i.e., general licences, on-premise licences, liquor stores, and club licences) and alcohol consumption at 20-years (n=988) and 22-years (n=893), and whether changes in the licences between time-points influenced alcohol consumption (n=665). Only general licences were associated with alcohol consumption at 20-years (p=0.037), but by 22-years, all licences types were positively associated with alcohol consumption (p<0.05). Longitudinal analyses showed that for each increase in liquor stores over time, alcohol consumption increased by 1.22 g/day or 8% (p=0.030), and for each additional club licence, consumption increased by 0.90 g/day or 6% (p=0.007). Limiting liquor licences could contribute to a reduction in young adults’ alcohol intake.

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KW - Alcohol outlet density

KW - Licence types

KW - Longitudinal

KW - Neighbourhood

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