Lipoprotein (a) and Low-density lipoprotein apolipoprotein B metabolism following apheresis in patients with elevated lipoprotein(a) and coronary artery disease

Louis Ma, Elisa Waldmann, Esther M M Ooi, Dick C Chan, Hugh P R Barrett, Gerald F Watts, Klaus G Parhofer

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Lipoprotein apheresis effectively lowers lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by approximately 60%-70%. The rebound of LDL and Lp(a) particle concentrations following lipoprotein apheresis allows the determination of fractional catabolic rate (FCR) and hence production rate (PR) during non-steady state conditions. We aimed to investigate the kinetics of Lp(a) and LDL apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB) particles in patients with elevated Lp(a) and coronary artery disease undergoing regular apheresis.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 13 patients with elevated Lp(a) concentration (>500 mg/L) and coronary artery disease. Lp(a) and LDL-apoB metabolic parameters, including FCR and PR were derived by the fit of a compartment model to the Lp(a) and LDL-apoB concentration data following lipoprotein apheresis.

RESULTS: The FCR of Lp(a) was significantly lower than that of LDL-apoB (0.39 [0.31, 0.49] vs 0.57 [0.46, 0.71] pools/day, P = 0.03) with no significant differences in the corresponding PR (14.80 [11.34, 19.32] vs 15.73 [11.93, 20.75] mg/kg/day, P = 0.80). No significant associations were observed between the FCR and PR of Lp(a) and LDL-apoB.

CONCLUSIONS: In patients with elevated Lp(a), the fractional catabolism of Lp(a) is slower than that of LDL-apoB particles, implying that different metabolic pathways are involved in the catabolism of these lipoproteins. These findings have implications for new therapies for lowering apolipoprotein(a) and apoB to prevent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e13053
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Investigation
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

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Blood Component Removal
Lipoprotein(a)
Apolipoproteins B
LDL Lipoproteins
Metabolism
Apolipoprotein B-100
Coronary Artery Disease
Lipoproteins
Apoprotein(a)
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cross-Sectional Studies

Cite this

@article{3ad58e9d184b406fb1e8ffc0d1bdf0d6,
title = "Lipoprotein (a) and Low-density lipoprotein apolipoprotein B metabolism following apheresis in patients with elevated lipoprotein(a) and coronary artery disease",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Lipoprotein apheresis effectively lowers lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by approximately 60{\%}-70{\%}. The rebound of LDL and Lp(a) particle concentrations following lipoprotein apheresis allows the determination of fractional catabolic rate (FCR) and hence production rate (PR) during non-steady state conditions. We aimed to investigate the kinetics of Lp(a) and LDL apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB) particles in patients with elevated Lp(a) and coronary artery disease undergoing regular apheresis.PATIENTS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 13 patients with elevated Lp(a) concentration (>500 mg/L) and coronary artery disease. Lp(a) and LDL-apoB metabolic parameters, including FCR and PR were derived by the fit of a compartment model to the Lp(a) and LDL-apoB concentration data following lipoprotein apheresis.RESULTS: The FCR of Lp(a) was significantly lower than that of LDL-apoB (0.39 [0.31, 0.49] vs 0.57 [0.46, 0.71] pools/day, P = 0.03) with no significant differences in the corresponding PR (14.80 [11.34, 19.32] vs 15.73 [11.93, 20.75] mg/kg/day, P = 0.80). No significant associations were observed between the FCR and PR of Lp(a) and LDL-apoB.CONCLUSIONS: In patients with elevated Lp(a), the fractional catabolism of Lp(a) is slower than that of LDL-apoB particles, implying that different metabolic pathways are involved in the catabolism of these lipoproteins. These findings have implications for new therapies for lowering apolipoprotein(a) and apoB to prevent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.",
author = "Louis Ma and Elisa Waldmann and Ooi, {Esther M M} and Chan, {Dick C} and Barrett, {Hugh P R} and Watts, {Gerald F} and Parhofer, {Klaus G}",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1111/eci.13053",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "e13053",
journal = "European Journal of Clinical Investigation",
issn = "0014-2972",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lipoprotein (a) and Low-density lipoprotein apolipoprotein B metabolism following apheresis in patients with elevated lipoprotein(a) and coronary artery disease

AU - Ma, Louis

AU - Waldmann, Elisa

AU - Ooi, Esther M M

AU - Chan, Dick C

AU - Barrett, Hugh P R

AU - Watts, Gerald F

AU - Parhofer, Klaus G

PY - 2019/2

Y1 - 2019/2

N2 - BACKGROUND: Lipoprotein apheresis effectively lowers lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by approximately 60%-70%. The rebound of LDL and Lp(a) particle concentrations following lipoprotein apheresis allows the determination of fractional catabolic rate (FCR) and hence production rate (PR) during non-steady state conditions. We aimed to investigate the kinetics of Lp(a) and LDL apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB) particles in patients with elevated Lp(a) and coronary artery disease undergoing regular apheresis.PATIENTS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 13 patients with elevated Lp(a) concentration (>500 mg/L) and coronary artery disease. Lp(a) and LDL-apoB metabolic parameters, including FCR and PR were derived by the fit of a compartment model to the Lp(a) and LDL-apoB concentration data following lipoprotein apheresis.RESULTS: The FCR of Lp(a) was significantly lower than that of LDL-apoB (0.39 [0.31, 0.49] vs 0.57 [0.46, 0.71] pools/day, P = 0.03) with no significant differences in the corresponding PR (14.80 [11.34, 19.32] vs 15.73 [11.93, 20.75] mg/kg/day, P = 0.80). No significant associations were observed between the FCR and PR of Lp(a) and LDL-apoB.CONCLUSIONS: In patients with elevated Lp(a), the fractional catabolism of Lp(a) is slower than that of LDL-apoB particles, implying that different metabolic pathways are involved in the catabolism of these lipoproteins. These findings have implications for new therapies for lowering apolipoprotein(a) and apoB to prevent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

AB - BACKGROUND: Lipoprotein apheresis effectively lowers lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by approximately 60%-70%. The rebound of LDL and Lp(a) particle concentrations following lipoprotein apheresis allows the determination of fractional catabolic rate (FCR) and hence production rate (PR) during non-steady state conditions. We aimed to investigate the kinetics of Lp(a) and LDL apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB) particles in patients with elevated Lp(a) and coronary artery disease undergoing regular apheresis.PATIENTS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 13 patients with elevated Lp(a) concentration (>500 mg/L) and coronary artery disease. Lp(a) and LDL-apoB metabolic parameters, including FCR and PR were derived by the fit of a compartment model to the Lp(a) and LDL-apoB concentration data following lipoprotein apheresis.RESULTS: The FCR of Lp(a) was significantly lower than that of LDL-apoB (0.39 [0.31, 0.49] vs 0.57 [0.46, 0.71] pools/day, P = 0.03) with no significant differences in the corresponding PR (14.80 [11.34, 19.32] vs 15.73 [11.93, 20.75] mg/kg/day, P = 0.80). No significant associations were observed between the FCR and PR of Lp(a) and LDL-apoB.CONCLUSIONS: In patients with elevated Lp(a), the fractional catabolism of Lp(a) is slower than that of LDL-apoB particles, implying that different metabolic pathways are involved in the catabolism of these lipoproteins. These findings have implications for new therapies for lowering apolipoprotein(a) and apoB to prevent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

U2 - 10.1111/eci.13053

DO - 10.1111/eci.13053

M3 - Article

VL - 49

SP - e13053

JO - European Journal of Clinical Investigation

JF - European Journal of Clinical Investigation

SN - 0014-2972

IS - 2

ER -