Lipid profile is associated with treatment regimen in a large cohort of children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes mellitus: a study from the international SWEET database

the SWEET study group

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Abstract

Aims: To examine the effect of pump vs injection therapy on the lipid profile of children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of the lipid profile of children aged ≤ 18 years with Type 1 diabetes mellitus from SWEET, an international diabetes registry, was conducted with a focus on the effect of treatment regimen. Dyslipidaemia was defined as LDL cholesterol ≥2.6 mmol/l or non-HDL cholesterol ≥3.1 mmol/l. LDL and non-HDL cholesterol values among 14 290 children (52% boys, 51% receiving pump therapy) from 60 SWEET centres were analysed by linear and logistic regression analysis adjusted for sex, age, diabetes duration, HbA1c and BMI-standard deviation score group, region, and common interactions between age, sex, HbA1c and BMI. Results: This study confirmed the established associations of increased lipids with female sex, age, diabetes duration, HbA1c and BMI. LDL and non-HDL cholesterol levels were lower in the pump therapy group compared to the injection therapy group [LDL cholesterol: injection therapy 2.44 mmol/l (95% CI 2.42 to 2.46) vs pump therapy 2.39 mmol/l (95% CI 2.37–2.41), P<0.001; non-HDL cholesterol: injection therapy 2.88 mmol/l (95% CI 2.86 to 2.90) vs pump therapy 2.80 mmol/l (95% CI 2.78–2.82), both P<0.0001]. Similarly, the odds ratios for LDL cholesterol ≥2.6 mmol/l [0.89 (95% CI 0.82–0.97)] and non-HDL cholesterol ≥3.1 mmol/l [0.85 (0.78 to 0.93)] were significantly lower in the pump therapy group, even after all adjustments. Conclusions: Our results indicate that pump therapy is associated with a better lipid profile.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDiabetic Medicine
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 Jan 2019

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Databases
Lipids
LDL Cholesterol
Group Psychotherapy
Injections
Cholesterol
Therapeutics
Social Adjustment
Dyslipidemias
Registries
Linear Models
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis

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@article{e62bbe964cc945408fdf45d7a595eb4d,
title = "Lipid profile is associated with treatment regimen in a large cohort of children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes mellitus: a study from the international SWEET database",
abstract = "Aims: To examine the effect of pump vs injection therapy on the lipid profile of children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of the lipid profile of children aged ≤ 18 years with Type 1 diabetes mellitus from SWEET, an international diabetes registry, was conducted with a focus on the effect of treatment regimen. Dyslipidaemia was defined as LDL cholesterol ≥2.6 mmol/l or non-HDL cholesterol ≥3.1 mmol/l. LDL and non-HDL cholesterol values among 14 290 children (52{\%} boys, 51{\%} receiving pump therapy) from 60 SWEET centres were analysed by linear and logistic regression analysis adjusted for sex, age, diabetes duration, HbA1c and BMI-standard deviation score group, region, and common interactions between age, sex, HbA1c and BMI. Results: This study confirmed the established associations of increased lipids with female sex, age, diabetes duration, HbA1c and BMI. LDL and non-HDL cholesterol levels were lower in the pump therapy group compared to the injection therapy group [LDL cholesterol: injection therapy 2.44 mmol/l (95{\%} CI 2.42 to 2.46) vs pump therapy 2.39 mmol/l (95{\%} CI 2.37–2.41), P<0.001; non-HDL cholesterol: injection therapy 2.88 mmol/l (95{\%} CI 2.86 to 2.90) vs pump therapy 2.80 mmol/l (95{\%} CI 2.78–2.82), both P<0.0001]. Similarly, the odds ratios for LDL cholesterol ≥2.6 mmol/l [0.89 (95{\%} CI 0.82–0.97)] and non-HDL cholesterol ≥3.1 mmol/l [0.85 (0.78 to 0.93)] were significantly lower in the pump therapy group, even after all adjustments. Conclusions: Our results indicate that pump therapy is associated with a better lipid profile.",
author = "{the SWEET study group} and I. Kosteria and A. Schwandt and E. Davis and S. Jali and M. Prieto and D. Rottembourg",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/dme.13963",
language = "English",
journal = "Diabetic Medicine: journal of diabetes UK",
issn = "0742-3071",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lipid profile is associated with treatment regimen in a large cohort of children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes mellitus

T2 - a study from the international SWEET database

AU - the SWEET study group

AU - Kosteria, I.

AU - Schwandt, A.

AU - Davis, E.

AU - Jali, S.

AU - Prieto, M.

AU - Rottembourg, D.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Aims: To examine the effect of pump vs injection therapy on the lipid profile of children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of the lipid profile of children aged ≤ 18 years with Type 1 diabetes mellitus from SWEET, an international diabetes registry, was conducted with a focus on the effect of treatment regimen. Dyslipidaemia was defined as LDL cholesterol ≥2.6 mmol/l or non-HDL cholesterol ≥3.1 mmol/l. LDL and non-HDL cholesterol values among 14 290 children (52% boys, 51% receiving pump therapy) from 60 SWEET centres were analysed by linear and logistic regression analysis adjusted for sex, age, diabetes duration, HbA1c and BMI-standard deviation score group, region, and common interactions between age, sex, HbA1c and BMI. Results: This study confirmed the established associations of increased lipids with female sex, age, diabetes duration, HbA1c and BMI. LDL and non-HDL cholesterol levels were lower in the pump therapy group compared to the injection therapy group [LDL cholesterol: injection therapy 2.44 mmol/l (95% CI 2.42 to 2.46) vs pump therapy 2.39 mmol/l (95% CI 2.37–2.41), P<0.001; non-HDL cholesterol: injection therapy 2.88 mmol/l (95% CI 2.86 to 2.90) vs pump therapy 2.80 mmol/l (95% CI 2.78–2.82), both P<0.0001]. Similarly, the odds ratios for LDL cholesterol ≥2.6 mmol/l [0.89 (95% CI 0.82–0.97)] and non-HDL cholesterol ≥3.1 mmol/l [0.85 (0.78 to 0.93)] were significantly lower in the pump therapy group, even after all adjustments. Conclusions: Our results indicate that pump therapy is associated with a better lipid profile.

AB - Aims: To examine the effect of pump vs injection therapy on the lipid profile of children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of the lipid profile of children aged ≤ 18 years with Type 1 diabetes mellitus from SWEET, an international diabetes registry, was conducted with a focus on the effect of treatment regimen. Dyslipidaemia was defined as LDL cholesterol ≥2.6 mmol/l or non-HDL cholesterol ≥3.1 mmol/l. LDL and non-HDL cholesterol values among 14 290 children (52% boys, 51% receiving pump therapy) from 60 SWEET centres were analysed by linear and logistic regression analysis adjusted for sex, age, diabetes duration, HbA1c and BMI-standard deviation score group, region, and common interactions between age, sex, HbA1c and BMI. Results: This study confirmed the established associations of increased lipids with female sex, age, diabetes duration, HbA1c and BMI. LDL and non-HDL cholesterol levels were lower in the pump therapy group compared to the injection therapy group [LDL cholesterol: injection therapy 2.44 mmol/l (95% CI 2.42 to 2.46) vs pump therapy 2.39 mmol/l (95% CI 2.37–2.41), P<0.001; non-HDL cholesterol: injection therapy 2.88 mmol/l (95% CI 2.86 to 2.90) vs pump therapy 2.80 mmol/l (95% CI 2.78–2.82), both P<0.0001]. Similarly, the odds ratios for LDL cholesterol ≥2.6 mmol/l [0.89 (95% CI 0.82–0.97)] and non-HDL cholesterol ≥3.1 mmol/l [0.85 (0.78 to 0.93)] were significantly lower in the pump therapy group, even after all adjustments. Conclusions: Our results indicate that pump therapy is associated with a better lipid profile.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85069830616&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/dme.13963

DO - 10.1111/dme.13963

M3 - Article

JO - Diabetic Medicine: journal of diabetes UK

JF - Diabetic Medicine: journal of diabetes UK

SN - 0742-3071

ER -