Leaf Respiration of Snow Gum in the Light and Dark. Interactions between Temperature and Irradiance.

O.K. Atkin, J.R. Evans, M.C. Ball, Hans Lambers, T.L. Pons

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    Abstract

    We investigated the effect of temperature and irradiance on leaf respiration (R, non-photorespiratory mitochondrial CO2 release) of snow gum (Eucalyptus pauciflora Sieb. ex Spreng). Seedlings were hydroponically grown under constant 20 degrees C, controlled-environment conditions. Measurements of R (using the Laisk method) and photosynthesis (at 37 Pa CO2) were made at several irradiances (0-2,000 mu mol photons m(-2) s(-1)) and temperatures (6 degrees C-30 degrees C). At 15 degrees C to 30 degrees C, substantial inhibition of R occurred at 12 mu mol photons m(-2) s(-1), with maximum inhibition occurring at 100 to 200 pmol photons m(-2) s(-1). Higher irradiance had little additional effect on R at these moderate temperatures. The irradiance necessary to maximally inhibit R at 6 degrees C to 10 degrees C was lower than that at 15 degrees C to 30 degrees C. Moreover, although R was inhibited by low irradiance at 6 degrees C to 10 degrees C, it recovered with progressive increases in irradiance. The temperature sensitivity of R was greater in darkness than under bright light. At 30 degrees C and high irradiance, light-inhibited rates of R represented 2% of gross CO2 uptake (v(c)), whereas photorespiratory CO2 release was approximately 20% of v(c). If light had not inhibited leaf respiration at 30 degrees C and high irradiance, R would have represented 11% of v(c). Variations in light inhibition of R can therefore have a substantial impact on the proportion of photosynthesis that is respired. We conclude that the rate of R in the light is highly variable, being dependent on irradiance and temperature.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)915-923
    JournalPlant Physiology
    Volume122
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2000

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