Leaf gas films contribute to rice (Oryza sativa) submergence tolerance during saline floods

Max Herzog, Dennis Konnerup, Ole Pedersen, Anders Winkel, Timothy David Colmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Floods and salinization of agricultural land adversely impact global rice production. We investigated whether gas films on leaves of submerged rice delay salt entry during saline submergence. Two-week-old plants with leaf gas films (+GF) or with gas films experimentally removed (-GF) were submerged in artificial floodwater with 0 or 50mm NaCl for up to 16d. Gas films were present >9d on GF plants after which gas films were diminished. Tissue ion analysis (Na+, Cl- and K+) showed that gas films caused some delay of Na+ entry, as leaf Na+ concentration was 36-42% higher in -GF leaves than +GF leaves on days 1-5. However, significant net uptakes of Na+ and Cl-, and K+ net loss, occurred despite the presence of gas films, indicating the likely presence of some leaf-to-floodwater contact, so that the gas layer must not have completely separated the leaf surfaces from the water. Natural loss and removal of gas films resulted in severe declines in growth, underwater photosynthesis, chlorophylla and tissue porosity. Submergence was more detrimental to leaf PN and growth than the additional effect of 50mm NaCl, as salt did not significantly affect underwater PN at 200μm CO2 nor growth.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)885-897
Number of pages13
JournalPlant Cell and Environment
Volume41
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2018

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submergence
Oryza sativa
Gases
gases
rice
leaves
Growth
Salts
salts
Oryza
Plant Leaves
Porosity
Photosynthesis
porosity
agricultural land
carbon dioxide
photosynthesis
Ions
ions
uptake mechanisms

Cite this

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abstract = "Floods and salinization of agricultural land adversely impact global rice production. We investigated whether gas films on leaves of submerged rice delay salt entry during saline submergence. Two-week-old plants with leaf gas films (+GF) or with gas films experimentally removed (-GF) were submerged in artificial floodwater with 0 or 50mm NaCl for up to 16d. Gas films were present >9d on GF plants after which gas films were diminished. Tissue ion analysis (Na+, Cl- and K+) showed that gas films caused some delay of Na+ entry, as leaf Na+ concentration was 36-42{\%} higher in -GF leaves than +GF leaves on days 1-5. However, significant net uptakes of Na+ and Cl-, and K+ net loss, occurred despite the presence of gas films, indicating the likely presence of some leaf-to-floodwater contact, so that the gas layer must not have completely separated the leaf surfaces from the water. Natural loss and removal of gas films resulted in severe declines in growth, underwater photosynthesis, chlorophylla and tissue porosity. Submergence was more detrimental to leaf PN and growth than the additional effect of 50mm NaCl, as salt did not significantly affect underwater PN at 200μm CO2 nor growth.",
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Leaf gas films contribute to rice (Oryza sativa) submergence tolerance during saline floods. / Herzog, Max; Konnerup, Dennis; Pedersen, Ole; Winkel, Anders; Colmer, Timothy David.

In: Plant Cell and Environment, Vol. 41, No. 5, 05.2018, p. 885-897.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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