Journey-Deuce bicompartmental knee arthroplasty with the addition of computer navigation achieves good clinical outcomes and implant survival at 10 years

Randeep S. Aujla, Jennifer Woodhouse, Jay R. Ebert, Michael Finsterwald, Christopher W. Jones, Piers Yates, Peter D’Alessandro, David J. Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To report 10-year outcomes and survivorship in patients undergoing bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BCKA) using the Journey-Deuce prosthesis in a consecutive prospective case series. Methods: Between November 2006 and November 2009, 41 patients with a mean age of 69.6 years (range 51–86) underwent 51 bicompartmental knee arthroplasties with the Journey-Deuce knee prosthesis. All patients presented with symptomatic medial and patellofemoral compartment osteoarthritis, with intact cruciate ligaments and a preserved lateral compartment on plain radiographs and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Clinical assessment was undertaken pre-surgery and at 1, 2, 5 and 10 years post-surgery using the Oxford Knee Score (OKS), EuroQol Group 5-Dimension self-reported questionnaire (EQ-5D) and maximal active range of motion (ROM). Results: 30 patients (37 knees) were followed-up at a mean time of 11.4 years (SD 1.1; range 10.5–14.0). Eight patients (ten knees) were deceased and three could not be contacted at final review. No major component revision was performed. Pre-operative OKS 25.4 (SD 5.2; range 15–40), knee flexion 116.4° (SD 10.3°; range 100°–140°) and EQ-5D 70.5 (SD 19.9; range 25–95). 10-year OKS 43.5 (SD 4.1; range 32–48), knee flexion 127.3° (SD 11.1°; range 105°–144°) and EQ-5D 77.4 (SD 9.3; range 60–100). The OKS (p < 0.0001), EQ-5D (p = 0.024) and active knee flexion ROM (p < 0.0001) all significantly improved from pre-surgery to 1-year post-surgery, with no further significant changes in these scores between any post-operative time period up until 10 years. 32% (7/22) of tibial and 45% (10/22) of femoral components showed progressive radiolucencies between 2 and 5-year and 10-year follow-up. Conclusions: This is the largest cohort of patients having undergone BCKA (with the Journey-Deuce prosthesis) with longest follow-up described in the literature. At 10 years, patients presented with significantly improved clinical outcomes, comparable to other surgical arthroplasty options. No major component revision was performed. Progressive radiolucencies were noted in 32% of tibial and 45% of femoral components without corresponding clinical signs of loosening. Level of evidence: Level III.

Original languageEnglish
JournalKnee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 May 2021

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