Is there a quasi-60 years’ oscillation of the Arctic sea ice extent?

Albert Parker, Clifford Ollier

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    A better understanding of the future climate pattern developments in the Arctic may only follow a better reconstruction of the past patterns of natural oscillations and the determination of the forcing and the resulting oscillations occurred in the climate parameters over different time scales. The proposed information for the past demonstrates the Walsh & Chapman reconstruction [1] claiming a flat sea ice 1870 to 1950 is too simple. The Arctic sea ice experienced a drastic reduction that was phased with warming temperatures 1923 to 1940. This reduction was followed by a sharp cooling and sea ice recovery. This permits us to also conclude that very likely the Arctic sea ice extent also has a quasi-60 years’ oscillation. The recognition of a quasi-60 year’s oscillation in the sea ice extent of the Arctic similar to the oscillation of the temperatures and the other climate indices may permit us to separate the natural from the anthropogenic forcing of the Arctic sea ice. The heliosphere and the Earth’s magnetosphere may have much stronger influence on the climate patterns on Earth including the Arctic sea ices than has been thought.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)77-94
    Number of pages18
    JournalJournal of Geography, Environment and Earth Science International
    Volume2
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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