Is a nudge all we need to promote deliberate clinical inertia and thoughtful clinical decision making?

Mieke Foster, Diana Egerton-Warburton, Louise Cullen, Daniel M. Fatovich, Gerben Keijzers

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

Abstract

Deliberate clinical inertia is the art of doing nothing as a positive response. Individual clinicians can promote deliberate clinical inertia through teaching, re-framing the act of ‘doing nothing’ as ‘doing something’ and engaging in shared decision making. Behaviour change on a larger scale requires a systematic approach. Nudging is a subtle change to the decision-making context to prompt specific choices. A nudge unit is a team of relevant professionals who engage with various multidisciplinary teams within a health service who help test and implement nudge interventions in a clinical environment. A nudge unit could be used to design environments to prompt clinicians to re-think before ordering unnecessary tests or treatments. Nudge units could improve knowledge translation, support continuous quality improvement and help build a learning health system. They could also boost collaboration and empower staff to evaluate their workplace decision-making frameworks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)748 - 752
JournalEMA - Emergency Medicine Australasia
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2021

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