Iron regulation in athletes: Exploring the menstrual cycle and effects of different exercise modalities on hepcidin production

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    Abstract

    The trace element iron plays a number of crucial physiological roles within the body. Despite its importance, iron deficiency remains a common problem among athletes. As an individual's iron stores become depleted, it can affect their well-being and athletic capacity. Recently, altered iron metabolism in athletes has been attributed to postexercise increases in the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin, which has been reported to be upregulated by exercise-induced increases in the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6. As such, when hepcidin levels are elevated, iron absorption and recycling may be compromised. To date, however, most studies have explored the acute postexercise hepcidin response, with limited research seeking to minimize/attenuate these increases. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the postexercise hepcidin response under a variety of exercise scenarios and highlights potential areas for future research-such as: a) the use of hormones though the female oral contraceptive pill to manipulate the postexercise hepcidin response, b) comparing the use of different exercise modes (e.g., cycling vs. running) on hepcidin regulation. © 2014 Human Kinetics, Inc.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)177-187
    JournalInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
    Volume24
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

    Fingerprint

    Hepcidins
    menstrual cycle
    athletes
    Menstrual Cycle
    Athletes
    exercise
    Iron
    Exercise
    iron
    Female Contraceptive Agents
    hormones
    Hormones
    oral contraceptives
    iron absorption
    Trace Elements
    Recycling
    Oral Contraceptives
    sports
    interleukin-6
    Running

    Cite this

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    title = "Iron regulation in athletes: Exploring the menstrual cycle and effects of different exercise modalities on hepcidin production",
    abstract = "The trace element iron plays a number of crucial physiological roles within the body. Despite its importance, iron deficiency remains a common problem among athletes. As an individual's iron stores become depleted, it can affect their well-being and athletic capacity. Recently, altered iron metabolism in athletes has been attributed to postexercise increases in the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin, which has been reported to be upregulated by exercise-induced increases in the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6. As such, when hepcidin levels are elevated, iron absorption and recycling may be compromised. To date, however, most studies have explored the acute postexercise hepcidin response, with limited research seeking to minimize/attenuate these increases. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the postexercise hepcidin response under a variety of exercise scenarios and highlights potential areas for future research-such as: a) the use of hormones though the female oral contraceptive pill to manipulate the postexercise hepcidin response, b) comparing the use of different exercise modes (e.g., cycling vs. running) on hepcidin regulation. {\circledC} 2014 Human Kinetics, Inc.",
    author = "Marc Sim and Brian Dawson and Grant Landers and Debbie Trinder and Peter Peeling",
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    AU - Dawson, Brian

    AU - Landers, Grant

    AU - Trinder, Debbie

    AU - Peeling, Peter

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    AB - The trace element iron plays a number of crucial physiological roles within the body. Despite its importance, iron deficiency remains a common problem among athletes. As an individual's iron stores become depleted, it can affect their well-being and athletic capacity. Recently, altered iron metabolism in athletes has been attributed to postexercise increases in the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin, which has been reported to be upregulated by exercise-induced increases in the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6. As such, when hepcidin levels are elevated, iron absorption and recycling may be compromised. To date, however, most studies have explored the acute postexercise hepcidin response, with limited research seeking to minimize/attenuate these increases. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the postexercise hepcidin response under a variety of exercise scenarios and highlights potential areas for future research-such as: a) the use of hormones though the female oral contraceptive pill to manipulate the postexercise hepcidin response, b) comparing the use of different exercise modes (e.g., cycling vs. running) on hepcidin regulation. © 2014 Human Kinetics, Inc.

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