Investigating the utility of T cell receptor repertoires to inform anti-cancer immunotherapy outcomes

Joel Kidman

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

23 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) causes durable tumour responses in a subgroup of patients for some cancers. However, ICB is expensive and causes side effects. Importantly, non-responding patients often do not benefit from ICB, raising the need to develop response biomarkers. T-cells are important for ICB induced anti-tumour immune responses, yet it is unclear if characteristics of T-cells such as T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire specificity, diversity, phenotype or dynamics can predict response. These chapters aim to advance our overall understanding of T-cells in the context of ICB and may translate to reducing harm to patients that receive no benefit from ICB.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Chee, Jonathan, Supervisor
  • Lesterhuis, Willem, Supervisor
  • Lake, Richard, Supervisor
  • Watson, Mark W., Supervisor, External person
Thesis sponsors
Award date9 Nov 2023
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2022

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