Investigating the long-term genetic outcomes of introducing an Australian periwinkle beyond its natural range of occurrence

Deanne Cummins

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

The need for translocations to conserve species has increased in recent decades due to many anthropogenic threats. However, a major risk associated with translocating species outside their natural range is unintentional hybridisation with a related species. There is a serious lack of empirical evidence of the potential long-term benefits (adaptive introgression) versus the perceived risks (outbreeding depression and genetic swamping) of interspecific hybridisation. The translocation of an Australian periwinkle, outside its native range and into the native range of its sister species, provided an opportunity to investigate the long-term genetic outcomes of interspecific hybridisation, in the context of assisted colonisation.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Kennington, Jason, Supervisor
  • Tomkins, Joseph, Supervisor
  • Kaur, Parwinder, Supervisor
  • Johnson, Michael, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date14 Nov 2023
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2023

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