Investigating marine bio-calcification mechanisms in a changing ocean with in vivo and high-resolution ex vivo Raman spectroscopy

Thomas M. DeCarlo, Steeve Comeau, Christopher E. Cornwall, Laura Gajdzik, Paul Guagliardo, Aleksey Sadekov, Emma C. Thillainath, Julie Trotter, Malcolm T. McCulloch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Ocean acidification poses a serious threat to marine calcifying organisms, yet experimental and field studies have found highly diverse responses among species and environments. Our understanding of the underlying drivers of differential responses to ocean acidification is currently limited by difficulties in directly observing and quantifying the mechanisms of bio-calcification. Here, we present Raman spectroscopy techniques for characterizing the skeletal mineralogy and calcifying fluid chemistry of marine calcifying organisms such as corals, coralline algae, foraminifera, and fish (carbonate otoliths). First, our in vivo Raman technique is the ideal tool for investigating non-classical mineralization pathways. This includes calcification by amorphous particle attachment, which has recently been controversially suggested as a mechanism by which corals resist the negative effects of ocean acidification. Second, high-resolution ex vivo Raman mapping reveals complex banding structures in the mineralogy of marine calcifiers, and provides a tool to quantify calcification responses to environmental variability on various timescales from days to years. We describe the new insights into marine bio-calcification that our techniques have already uncovered, and we consider the wide range of questions regarding calcifier responses to global change that can now be proposed and addressed with these new Raman spectroscopy tools.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1877-1888
JournalGlobal Change Biology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Acidification
calcification
Raman spectroscopy
Mineralogy
ocean
coral
mineralogy
Carbonates
Algae
Fish
coralline alga
otolith
global change
foraminifera
Fluids
experimental study
mineralization
timescale
carbonate
fluid

Cite this

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title = "Investigating marine bio-calcification mechanisms in a changing ocean with in vivo and high-resolution ex vivo Raman spectroscopy",
abstract = "Ocean acidification poses a serious threat to marine calcifying organisms, yet experimental and field studies have found highly diverse responses among species and environments. Our understanding of the underlying drivers of differential responses to ocean acidification is currently limited by difficulties in directly observing and quantifying the mechanisms of bio-calcification. Here, we present Raman spectroscopy techniques for characterizing the skeletal mineralogy and calcifying fluid chemistry of marine calcifying organisms such as corals, coralline algae, foraminifera, and fish (carbonate otoliths). First, our in vivo Raman technique is the ideal tool for investigating non-classical mineralization pathways. This includes calcification by amorphous particle attachment, which has recently been controversially suggested as a mechanism by which corals resist the negative effects of ocean acidification. Second, high-resolution ex vivo Raman mapping reveals complex banding structures in the mineralogy of marine calcifiers, and provides a tool to quantify calcification responses to environmental variability on various timescales from days to years. We describe the new insights into marine bio-calcification that our techniques have already uncovered, and we consider the wide range of questions regarding calcifier responses to global change that can now be proposed and addressed with these new Raman spectroscopy tools.",
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Investigating marine bio-calcification mechanisms in a changing ocean with in vivo and high-resolution ex vivo Raman spectroscopy. / DeCarlo, Thomas M.; Comeau, Steeve; Cornwall, Christopher E.; Gajdzik, Laura; Guagliardo, Paul; Sadekov, Aleksey; Thillainath, Emma C.; Trotter, Julie; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

In: Global Change Biology, 28.01.2019, p. 1877-1888.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Guagliardo, Paul

AU - Sadekov, Aleksey

AU - Thillainath, Emma C.

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AU - McCulloch, Malcolm T.

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