Investigating epigenetic regulation of gene expression at singlenucleus resolution in development and neurodevelopmental disorders

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

The human brain consists of billions of cells, arranged and interconnected in sophisticated structures to allow for complex communication and interaction. There are dozens of different types of cells in the brain that form precursor cells early in development and continue to change through to adulthood. My PhD project focussed on using genomic approaches to characterise transcriptional and epigenome states, dynamics, and differences in the brain, in the context of brain development, neuronal stimulation, and neurological disorders. Overall, this work advanced methods for neuroepigenomic analyses and provided new insights into normal and disrupted brain development and function.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Lister, Ryan, Supervisor
  • Freytag, Saskia, Supervisor
  • Small, Ian, Supervisor
  • Millar, Harvey, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date3 Jun 2021
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2021

Embargo information

  • Embargoed from 15/06/2021 to 30/06/2023. Made publicly available on 30/06/2023.

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