Inverse correlation between resting motor threshold and corticomotor excitability after static magnetic stimulation of human motor cortex

B.I. Silbert, D.D. Pevcic, Heather Patterson, K.A. Windnagel, Gary Thickbroom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: High-strength static magnetic field stimulation (SMS) results in a period of reduced corticomotor excitability that may be mediated through a decrease in membrane excitability. Objective: As resting motor threshold (RMT) is thought to reflect membrane excitability, we hypothesized that SMS may increase RMT and that there would be an inverse relationship between RMT and motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitude. Methods: Ten healthy subjects (aged 20-29; 4 females) participated in a double-blinded crossover design comparing MEP amplitude and RMT before and after a 15-min period of SMS or sham stimulation over primary motor cortex (M1). Results: MEP amplitude was initially significantly reduced post-SMS (∼20%), and returned to baseline by 6 min post-intervention. MEP amplitude and RMT were inversely correlated (r 2 = 0.924; P = 0.001). Sham stimulation had no effect on MEP amplitude (P = 0.969) or RMT (P = 0.549). Conclusion: After SMS, corticomotor excitability is transiently reduced in association with a correlated modulation of RMT. SMS after effects may be mediated in part by a reduction in membrane excitability, suggesting a possible role for non-synaptic (intrinsic) plasticity mechanisms. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)817-820
JournalBrain Stimulation
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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