Interactive effects of phosphorus deficiency and exogenous auxin on root morphological and physiological traits in white lupin (Lupinus albus L.)

H. Tang, J. Shen, F. Zhang, Zed Rengel

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    White lupin (Lupinus albus) exhibits strong root morphological and physiological responses to phosphorus (P) deficiency and auxin treatments, but the interactive effects of P and auxin in regulating root morphological and physiological traits are not fully understood. This study aimed to assess white lupin root traits as influenced by P (0 or 250 μmol L-1) and auxin (10-8 mol L-1 NAA) in nutrient solution. Both P deficiency and auxin treatments significantly altered root morphological traits, as evidenced by reduced taproot length, increased number and density of first-order lateral roots, and enhanced cluster-root formation. Changes in root physiological traits were also observed, i. e., increased proton, citrate, and acid phosphatase exudation. Exogenous auxin enhanced root responses and sensitivity to P deficiency. A significant interplay exists between P and auxin in the regulation of root morphological and physiological traits. Principal component analysis showed that P availability explained 64. 8% and auxin addition 21. 3% of the total variation in root trait parameters, indicating that P availability is much more important than auxin in modifying root responses of white lupin. This suggests that white lupin can coordinate root morphological and physiological responses to enhance acquisition of P resources, with an optimal trade-off between root morphological and physiological traits regulated by external stimuli such as P availability and auxin. © 2013 The Author(s).
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)313-323
    JournalScience China Life Sciences
    Volume56
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Interactive effects of phosphorus deficiency and exogenous auxin on root morphological and physiological traits in white lupin (Lupinus albus L.)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this