Interactions of sprint interval exercise and psychological need-support on subsequent food intake among physically inactive men and women

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sprint interval exercise (SIT) and psychological need-support in exercise on post-exercise appetite and energy intake. Forty physically inactive men and women (BMI 24.6 ± 4.8 kg·m-2, V̇O2peak 26.6 ± 4.9 mL·kg-1·min-1) were randomised to either a need-support or no-support condition, with each participant completing two experimental trials involving 30 min of moderate-intensity continuous cycling (MICT; 60% V̇O2peak) and SIT (alternating 15 s at 170% V̇O2peak and 60 s at 32% V̇O2peak) matched for total work. Perceptions of appetite and appetite-related blood variables were assessed, together with ad libitum energy intake for three hours following exercise using a laboratory test meal and available snacks. Greater enjoyment, perceived exertion, heart rate, and blood lactate were observed in SIT compared with MICT (all p ≤ 0.006). Ratings of perceived appetite were similar across conditions and trials (p > 0.05); however, active ghrelin was lower following SIT compared with MICT (p

Original languageEnglish
JournalAPPLIED PHYSIOLOGY NUTRITION AND METABOLISM-PHYSIOLOGIE APPLIQUEE NUTRITION ET METABOLISME
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 4 Feb 2020

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