Insomnia and health-related quality of life in stroke

W.K. Tang, C.G. Lau, V. Mok, Gabor Ungvari, K.S. Wong

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    Abstract

    © W. S. Maney & Son Ltd 2015. Background: Insomnia is a common complaint in stroke survivors. Insomnia after stroke is correlated with physical disability, dementia, anxiety, depression, and fatigue. However, the influence of insomnia following stroke on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has not been investigated. Objectives: The current study aimed to examine the effect of insomnia on HRQoL in stroke survivors 3 months after their index stroke over and above confounding variables. Method: Three hundred and thirty-six patients were recruited from the acute stroke unit in a regional hospital in Hong Kong. Insomnia was ascertained by a single item on a locally validated, seven-item insomnia questionnaire. HRQoL was measured by the total score and the 12 domain scores of the Stroke Specific Quality of Life (SSQoL) scale. Demographic and clinical characteristics were obtained using the following scales: National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), Barthel Index (BI), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Results: Forty-four percent of stroke survivors reported experiencing insomnia in the past month; they were more likely to be female and to have a higher GDS score. The insomnia group had significantly lower overall SSQoL, energy and thinking scores after adjusting for sex, BI, and GDS scores. Conclusion: The findings show that stroke survivors who experienced insomnia had a reduced overall HRQoL and were impaired in the energy and thinking domains of HRQoL. Early screening for sleep disturbance would be beneficial to prevent later development of post-stroke insomnia. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions are suggested to improve HRQoL in stroke patients with insomnia.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)201-207
    JournalTopics in Stroke Rehabilitation
    Volume22
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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