Inhalant allergen-specific T cell reactivity is detectable in close to 100% of atopic and normal individuals: covert responses are unmasked by serum-free medium

J.W. Upham, B.J. Holt, M.J. Baron-Hay, A. Yabuhara, Belinda Hales, W.R. Thomas, R.K.S. Loh, P. O'Keefe, L. Palmer, P. Lesouef, P.D. Sly, P.R. Burton, Bruce Robinson, P.G. Holt

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Abstract

Background It is widely held that in vitro T cell responses to allergens are more prominent in atopic than in normal individuals, though this conclusion is based upon culture techniques which fail to detect proliferative responses in a significant minority of atopics and many normals.Objectives: Study allergen-specific proliferative responses of T cells cultured in serum-free medium (SFM). Examine associations between atopic status, age and T cell reactivity.Methods Initially, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with allergens or antigens in SFM, and compared with cells cultured in RPMI + 10% fetal calf serum or human AB serum. Subsequently, T cell reactivity was studied in 34 adults (20-49 years), 27 children (2-13 years), and 19 infants (less than or equal to 10 weeks) using SFM alone.Results Compared with serum-supplemented medium, SFM enhanced net T cell proliferation, both in bulk culture and when cloning at limiting dilution. In many subjects, SFM unmasked T cell reactivity to allergens which was not otherwise evident, and lowered the threshold allergen levels required for in vitro T cell triggering. For most allergens, T cell proliferative responses did not differ between adults who had specific IgE, and those who did not. The most vigorous responses observed were to ubiquitous inhalant allergens, which stimulated T cells from close to 100% of adults and children, and over 60% of infants. In contrast, responses to the 'vaccine' antigen tetanus toroid were completely absent in the latter age group, but present in the majority of adults and children.Conclusions These findings suggest that the extent of active T cell recognition of environmental allergens has been hitherto underestimated, and further that these responses may frequently be initiated in very early life. Additionally, these findings reinforce the notion that qualitative (as opposed to quantitative) variations in specific T cell reactivity ultimately determine allergen responder phenotype.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)634-642
JournalClinical and Experimental Allergy
Volume25
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1995

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Serum-Free Culture Media
Allergens
T-Lymphocytes
Serum
Antigens
Culture Techniques
Tetanus Toxoid
Immunoglobulin E
Organism Cloning
Cultured Cells
Blood Cells
Age Groups
Cell Proliferation
Phenotype

Cite this

Upham, J.W. ; Holt, B.J. ; Baron-Hay, M.J. ; Yabuhara, A. ; Hales, Belinda ; Thomas, W.R. ; Loh, R.K.S. ; O'Keefe, P. ; Palmer, L. ; Lesouef, P. ; Sly, P.D. ; Burton, P.R. ; Robinson, Bruce ; Holt, P.G. / Inhalant allergen-specific T cell reactivity is detectable in close to 100% of atopic and normal individuals: covert responses are unmasked by serum-free medium. In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy. 1995 ; Vol. 25. pp. 634-642.
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title = "Inhalant allergen-specific T cell reactivity is detectable in close to 100{\%} of atopic and normal individuals: covert responses are unmasked by serum-free medium",
abstract = "Background It is widely held that in vitro T cell responses to allergens are more prominent in atopic than in normal individuals, though this conclusion is based upon culture techniques which fail to detect proliferative responses in a significant minority of atopics and many normals.Objectives: Study allergen-specific proliferative responses of T cells cultured in serum-free medium (SFM). Examine associations between atopic status, age and T cell reactivity.Methods Initially, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with allergens or antigens in SFM, and compared with cells cultured in RPMI + 10{\%} fetal calf serum or human AB serum. Subsequently, T cell reactivity was studied in 34 adults (20-49 years), 27 children (2-13 years), and 19 infants (less than or equal to 10 weeks) using SFM alone.Results Compared with serum-supplemented medium, SFM enhanced net T cell proliferation, both in bulk culture and when cloning at limiting dilution. In many subjects, SFM unmasked T cell reactivity to allergens which was not otherwise evident, and lowered the threshold allergen levels required for in vitro T cell triggering. For most allergens, T cell proliferative responses did not differ between adults who had specific IgE, and those who did not. The most vigorous responses observed were to ubiquitous inhalant allergens, which stimulated T cells from close to 100{\%} of adults and children, and over 60{\%} of infants. In contrast, responses to the 'vaccine' antigen tetanus toroid were completely absent in the latter age group, but present in the majority of adults and children.Conclusions These findings suggest that the extent of active T cell recognition of environmental allergens has been hitherto underestimated, and further that these responses may frequently be initiated in very early life. Additionally, these findings reinforce the notion that qualitative (as opposed to quantitative) variations in specific T cell reactivity ultimately determine allergen responder phenotype.",
author = "J.W. Upham and B.J. Holt and M.J. Baron-Hay and A. Yabuhara and Belinda Hales and W.R. Thomas and R.K.S. Loh and P. O'Keefe and L. Palmer and P. Lesouef and P.D. Sly and P.R. Burton and Bruce Robinson and P.G. Holt",
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Inhalant allergen-specific T cell reactivity is detectable in close to 100% of atopic and normal individuals: covert responses are unmasked by serum-free medium. / Upham, J.W.; Holt, B.J.; Baron-Hay, M.J.; Yabuhara, A.; Hales, Belinda; Thomas, W.R.; Loh, R.K.S.; O'Keefe, P.; Palmer, L.; Lesouef, P.; Sly, P.D.; Burton, P.R.; Robinson, Bruce; Holt, P.G.

In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, Vol. 25, 1995, p. 634-642.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inhalant allergen-specific T cell reactivity is detectable in close to 100% of atopic and normal individuals: covert responses are unmasked by serum-free medium

AU - Upham, J.W.

AU - Holt, B.J.

AU - Baron-Hay, M.J.

AU - Yabuhara, A.

AU - Hales, Belinda

AU - Thomas, W.R.

AU - Loh, R.K.S.

AU - O'Keefe, P.

AU - Palmer, L.

AU - Lesouef, P.

AU - Sly, P.D.

AU - Burton, P.R.

AU - Robinson, Bruce

AU - Holt, P.G.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - Background It is widely held that in vitro T cell responses to allergens are more prominent in atopic than in normal individuals, though this conclusion is based upon culture techniques which fail to detect proliferative responses in a significant minority of atopics and many normals.Objectives: Study allergen-specific proliferative responses of T cells cultured in serum-free medium (SFM). Examine associations between atopic status, age and T cell reactivity.Methods Initially, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with allergens or antigens in SFM, and compared with cells cultured in RPMI + 10% fetal calf serum or human AB serum. Subsequently, T cell reactivity was studied in 34 adults (20-49 years), 27 children (2-13 years), and 19 infants (less than or equal to 10 weeks) using SFM alone.Results Compared with serum-supplemented medium, SFM enhanced net T cell proliferation, both in bulk culture and when cloning at limiting dilution. In many subjects, SFM unmasked T cell reactivity to allergens which was not otherwise evident, and lowered the threshold allergen levels required for in vitro T cell triggering. For most allergens, T cell proliferative responses did not differ between adults who had specific IgE, and those who did not. The most vigorous responses observed were to ubiquitous inhalant allergens, which stimulated T cells from close to 100% of adults and children, and over 60% of infants. In contrast, responses to the 'vaccine' antigen tetanus toroid were completely absent in the latter age group, but present in the majority of adults and children.Conclusions These findings suggest that the extent of active T cell recognition of environmental allergens has been hitherto underestimated, and further that these responses may frequently be initiated in very early life. Additionally, these findings reinforce the notion that qualitative (as opposed to quantitative) variations in specific T cell reactivity ultimately determine allergen responder phenotype.

AB - Background It is widely held that in vitro T cell responses to allergens are more prominent in atopic than in normal individuals, though this conclusion is based upon culture techniques which fail to detect proliferative responses in a significant minority of atopics and many normals.Objectives: Study allergen-specific proliferative responses of T cells cultured in serum-free medium (SFM). Examine associations between atopic status, age and T cell reactivity.Methods Initially, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with allergens or antigens in SFM, and compared with cells cultured in RPMI + 10% fetal calf serum or human AB serum. Subsequently, T cell reactivity was studied in 34 adults (20-49 years), 27 children (2-13 years), and 19 infants (less than or equal to 10 weeks) using SFM alone.Results Compared with serum-supplemented medium, SFM enhanced net T cell proliferation, both in bulk culture and when cloning at limiting dilution. In many subjects, SFM unmasked T cell reactivity to allergens which was not otherwise evident, and lowered the threshold allergen levels required for in vitro T cell triggering. For most allergens, T cell proliferative responses did not differ between adults who had specific IgE, and those who did not. The most vigorous responses observed were to ubiquitous inhalant allergens, which stimulated T cells from close to 100% of adults and children, and over 60% of infants. In contrast, responses to the 'vaccine' antigen tetanus toroid were completely absent in the latter age group, but present in the majority of adults and children.Conclusions These findings suggest that the extent of active T cell recognition of environmental allergens has been hitherto underestimated, and further that these responses may frequently be initiated in very early life. Additionally, these findings reinforce the notion that qualitative (as opposed to quantitative) variations in specific T cell reactivity ultimately determine allergen responder phenotype.

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-2222.1995.tb01111.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2222.1995.tb01111.x

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 634

EP - 642

JO - Clinical & Experimental Allergy

JF - Clinical & Experimental Allergy

SN - 0954-7894

ER -