Influxes and invaders: the intersections between the metaphoric construction of immigrant otherness and ethnonationalism

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Metaphors are a feature of public immigration discourse, with "undesirable" immigrants referred to as invasions, influxes, and floods both in the press and by politicians. Within Australia, such metaphors date back to the arrival of Chinese immigrants during the gold rushes (1850s), reoccurring with every large-scale arrival of non-white immigrants. Enacting racialized immigration restrictions was one of the foundational acts of the new Australian nation (1901), with whiteness enshrined as fundamental to national identity within the White Australia policy. Yet despite the abolition of the policy in the 1970s and the shift to multiculturalism, increasing non-white immigration has been accompanied by an intensification of negative immigration metaphors. I argue that this is because metaphors which construct racialized immigrant Otherness simultaneously flag ethnonationalist understandings about what it means to be Australian by implicitly centring (Anglo) whiteness as the defining feature of Australian national identity in a way no longer explicitly possible.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1478-1501
Number of pages24
JournalEthnic and Racial Studies
Volume46
Issue number7
Early online date18 Nov 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Influxes and invaders: the intersections between the metaphoric construction of immigrant otherness and ethnonationalism'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this