Increased central adiposity is associated with pro-inflammatory immunoglobulin G N-glycans

Alyce C. Russell, Agnieszka Kepka, Irena Trbojević-Akmačić, Ivo Ugrina, Manshu Song, Jennie Hui, Michael Hunter, Simon M. Laws, Gordan Lauc, Wei Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Increased body fat may be associated with an increased risk of developing an underlying pro-inflammatory state, thus leading to greater risk of developing certain chronic conditions. Immunoglobulin G has the ability to exert both anti- and pro-inflammatory effects, and the N-glycosylation of the fragment crystallisable portion is involved in mediating this process. Body mass index, a rudimentary yet gold standard indication for body fat, has been shown to be associated with agalactosylated immunoglobulin G N-glycans. Aim: We aimed to determine the association between increased body fat and the immunoglobulin G glycosylation features, comparing body mass index to other measures of body fat distribution. Methods: We investigated a sample of 637 community-based 45–69 year olds, with mixed phenotypes, residing in Busselton, Western Australia. Body mass index and the waist-to-hip and waist-to-height ratios were calculated using anthropometry, while dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was performed to gain an accurate measure of total and area specific body fat. Serum immunoglobulin GN-glycans were analysed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography. Results: Twenty-two N-glycan peaks were found to be associated with at least one of the fat measures. While the previous association of body mass index to agalactosylated immunoglobulin G was replicated, measures of central adiposity explained the most variation in the immunoglobulin G glycome. Conclusion: Central adiposity is associated with an increased pro-inflammatory fraction of immunoglobulin G, suggesting that the android/gynoid ratio or waist-to-height ratio instead be considered when controlling for adiposity in immunoglobulin G glycome biomarker studies.

Original languageEnglish
JournalImmunobiology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 19 Oct 2018

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Adiposity
Polysaccharides
Immunoglobulin G
Adipose Tissue
Body Mass Index
Glycosylation
Body Fat Distribution
Western Australia
Anthropometry
Liquid Chromatography
Immunoglobulins
Hip
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Biomarkers
Fats
X-Rays
Phenotype
Serum

Cite this

Russell, Alyce C. ; Kepka, Agnieszka ; Trbojević-Akmačić, Irena ; Ugrina, Ivo ; Song, Manshu ; Hui, Jennie ; Hunter, Michael ; Laws, Simon M. ; Lauc, Gordan ; Wang, Wei. / Increased central adiposity is associated with pro-inflammatory immunoglobulin G N-glycans. In: Immunobiology. 2018.
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abstract = "Background: Increased body fat may be associated with an increased risk of developing an underlying pro-inflammatory state, thus leading to greater risk of developing certain chronic conditions. Immunoglobulin G has the ability to exert both anti- and pro-inflammatory effects, and the N-glycosylation of the fragment crystallisable portion is involved in mediating this process. Body mass index, a rudimentary yet gold standard indication for body fat, has been shown to be associated with agalactosylated immunoglobulin G N-glycans. Aim: We aimed to determine the association between increased body fat and the immunoglobulin G glycosylation features, comparing body mass index to other measures of body fat distribution. Methods: We investigated a sample of 637 community-based 45–69 year olds, with mixed phenotypes, residing in Busselton, Western Australia. Body mass index and the waist-to-hip and waist-to-height ratios were calculated using anthropometry, while dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was performed to gain an accurate measure of total and area specific body fat. Serum immunoglobulin GN-glycans were analysed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography. Results: Twenty-two N-glycan peaks were found to be associated with at least one of the fat measures. While the previous association of body mass index to agalactosylated immunoglobulin G was replicated, measures of central adiposity explained the most variation in the immunoglobulin G glycome. Conclusion: Central adiposity is associated with an increased pro-inflammatory fraction of immunoglobulin G, suggesting that the android/gynoid ratio or waist-to-height ratio instead be considered when controlling for adiposity in immunoglobulin G glycome biomarker studies.",
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Increased central adiposity is associated with pro-inflammatory immunoglobulin G N-glycans. / Russell, Alyce C.; Kepka, Agnieszka; Trbojević-Akmačić, Irena; Ugrina, Ivo; Song, Manshu; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, Michael; Laws, Simon M.; Lauc, Gordan; Wang, Wei.

In: Immunobiology, 19.10.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Increased central adiposity is associated with pro-inflammatory immunoglobulin G N-glycans

AU - Russell, Alyce C.

AU - Kepka, Agnieszka

AU - Trbojević-Akmačić, Irena

AU - Ugrina, Ivo

AU - Song, Manshu

AU - Hui, Jennie

AU - Hunter, Michael

AU - Laws, Simon M.

AU - Lauc, Gordan

AU - Wang, Wei

PY - 2018/10/19

Y1 - 2018/10/19

N2 - Background: Increased body fat may be associated with an increased risk of developing an underlying pro-inflammatory state, thus leading to greater risk of developing certain chronic conditions. Immunoglobulin G has the ability to exert both anti- and pro-inflammatory effects, and the N-glycosylation of the fragment crystallisable portion is involved in mediating this process. Body mass index, a rudimentary yet gold standard indication for body fat, has been shown to be associated with agalactosylated immunoglobulin G N-glycans. Aim: We aimed to determine the association between increased body fat and the immunoglobulin G glycosylation features, comparing body mass index to other measures of body fat distribution. Methods: We investigated a sample of 637 community-based 45–69 year olds, with mixed phenotypes, residing in Busselton, Western Australia. Body mass index and the waist-to-hip and waist-to-height ratios were calculated using anthropometry, while dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was performed to gain an accurate measure of total and area specific body fat. Serum immunoglobulin GN-glycans were analysed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography. Results: Twenty-two N-glycan peaks were found to be associated with at least one of the fat measures. While the previous association of body mass index to agalactosylated immunoglobulin G was replicated, measures of central adiposity explained the most variation in the immunoglobulin G glycome. Conclusion: Central adiposity is associated with an increased pro-inflammatory fraction of immunoglobulin G, suggesting that the android/gynoid ratio or waist-to-height ratio instead be considered when controlling for adiposity in immunoglobulin G glycome biomarker studies.

AB - Background: Increased body fat may be associated with an increased risk of developing an underlying pro-inflammatory state, thus leading to greater risk of developing certain chronic conditions. Immunoglobulin G has the ability to exert both anti- and pro-inflammatory effects, and the N-glycosylation of the fragment crystallisable portion is involved in mediating this process. Body mass index, a rudimentary yet gold standard indication for body fat, has been shown to be associated with agalactosylated immunoglobulin G N-glycans. Aim: We aimed to determine the association between increased body fat and the immunoglobulin G glycosylation features, comparing body mass index to other measures of body fat distribution. Methods: We investigated a sample of 637 community-based 45–69 year olds, with mixed phenotypes, residing in Busselton, Western Australia. Body mass index and the waist-to-hip and waist-to-height ratios were calculated using anthropometry, while dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was performed to gain an accurate measure of total and area specific body fat. Serum immunoglobulin GN-glycans were analysed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography. Results: Twenty-two N-glycan peaks were found to be associated with at least one of the fat measures. While the previous association of body mass index to agalactosylated immunoglobulin G was replicated, measures of central adiposity explained the most variation in the immunoglobulin G glycome. Conclusion: Central adiposity is associated with an increased pro-inflammatory fraction of immunoglobulin G, suggesting that the android/gynoid ratio or waist-to-height ratio instead be considered when controlling for adiposity in immunoglobulin G glycome biomarker studies.

KW - Body mass index

KW - Central adiposity

KW - Glycosylation

KW - Immunoglobulin G

KW - Pro-inflammation

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DO - 10.1016/j.imbio.2018.10.002

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JF - Immunobiology

SN - 0171-2985

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