Incidence and predictors of cognitive impairment and dementia in Aboriginal Australians: A follow up study of 5 years.

Dina Lo Giudice, Kate Smith, S Fenner, Zoe Hyde, David Atkinson, Linda Skeaf, Ros Malay, Leon Flicker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction
Aboriginal Australians are reported to develop dementia earlier than the general population. The causes remain unknown.

Methods
This was a longitudinal study of 363 participants aged ≥45 years. Consensus diagnoses were established for cognitive impairment or dementia.

Results
At follow-up, 189 people (mean ± standard deviation age, 65.4 ± 10.3 years) participated, as 109 (30%) had died and 65 (18%) were unavailable. The incidence of cognitive impairment or dementia was 52.6 (95% confidence interval 33.9, 81.5) per 1000 person-years (380.3 total person-years) and for dementia was 21.0 (10.5, 42.1) per 1000 person-years (380.3 person-years total) over the age 60 years. Longitudinal risk factors associated with a decline from normal cognition to impairment were age and head injury. Other associations with cognitive decline were stroke, head injury, nonaspirin analgesics, lower BMI, and higher systolic BP.

Discussion
Dementia incidence in Aboriginal Australians is among the highest in the world, and is associated with age and head injury.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)252-261
Number of pages10
JournalALZHEIMERS & DEMENTIA
Volume12
Issue number3
Early online date18 May 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2016

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Incidence and predictors of cognitive impairment and dementia in Aboriginal Australians: A follow up study of 5 years.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this