In vitro fermentation gas kinetics and end-products of soluble and insoluble cereal flour dietary fibres are similar

Penny Comino, Barbara A. Williams, Michael J. Gidley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Insoluble dietary fibre is often considered to be fermented slower and to a lesser extent in (models for) the colon than soluble dietary fibre. However these comparisons are typically made for fibre components of different composition. In the case of fibre from refined cereal flours, there is little difference in fibre composition between soluble and insoluble forms, so effects of solubility on fermentation can be tested without this confounding factor. For each of wheat, rye, and hull-less barley, soluble and insoluble fibre fractions from refined flour and models for baking and extrusion had comparable in vitro fermentation rates and extents, with similar levels of short chain fatty acid metabolites. This study suggests that there should be little difference in the large intestinal nutritional functionality of the soluble and insoluble fibre fractions from cereal grain flours, either unprocessed or after baking or extrusion processing.

Original languageEnglish
Article number9
Pages (from-to)898-905
Number of pages8
JournalFood and Function
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2018
Externally publishedYes

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