In utero exposure to breast cancer treatment: a population-based perinatal outcome study

Nadom Safi, Antoinette Anazodo, Jan E. Dickinson, Kei Lui, Alex Y. Wang, Zhuoyang Li, Elizabeth A. Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Abstract

Chemotherapy during a viable pregnancy may be associated with adverse perinatal outcomes. We conducted a prospective cohort study to examine the perinatal outcomes of babies born following in utero exposure to chemotherapy in Australia and New Zealand. Over 18 months we identified 24 births, of >400 g and/or >20-weeks' gestation, to women diagnosed with breast cancer in the first or second trimesters. Eighteen babies were exposed in utero to chemotherapy. Chemotherapy commenced at a median of 20 weeks gestation, for a mean duration of 10 weeks. Twelve exposed infants were born preterm with 11 by induced labour or pre-labour caesarean section. There were no perinatal deaths or congenital malformations. Our findings show that breast cancer diagnosed during mid-pregnancy is often treated with chemotherapy. Other than induced preterm births, there were no serious adverse perinatal outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)719-721
JournalBritish Journal of Cancer
Volume121
Issue number8
Early online date6 Sep 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 2019

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