In utero exposure to breast cancer treatment: a population-based perinatal outcome study

Nadom Safi, Antoinette Anazodo, Jan E. Dickinson, Kei Lui, Alex Y. Wang, Zhuoyang Li, Elizabeth A. Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Abstract

Chemotherapy during a viable pregnancy may be associated with adverse perinatal outcomes. We conducted a prospective cohort study to examine the perinatal outcomes of babies born following in utero exposure to chemotherapy in Australia and New Zealand. Over 18 months we identified 24 births, of >400 g and/or >20-weeks' gestation, to women diagnosed with breast cancer in the first or second trimesters. Eighteen babies were exposed in utero to chemotherapy. Chemotherapy commenced at a median of 20 weeks gestation, for a mean duration of 10 weeks. Twelve exposed infants were born preterm with 11 by induced labour or pre-labour caesarean section. There were no perinatal deaths or congenital malformations. Our findings show that breast cancer diagnosed during mid-pregnancy is often treated with chemotherapy. Other than induced preterm births, there were no serious adverse perinatal outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Cancer
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Sep 2019

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Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Breast Neoplasms
Drug Therapy
Pregnancy
Population
Induced Labor
Therapeutics
Premature Birth
Second Pregnancy Trimester
First Pregnancy Trimester
New Zealand
Cesarean Section
Cohort Studies
Parturition
Prospective Studies

Cite this

Safi, Nadom ; Anazodo, Antoinette ; Dickinson, Jan E. ; Lui, Kei ; Wang, Alex Y. ; Li, Zhuoyang ; Sullivan, Elizabeth A. / In utero exposure to breast cancer treatment : a population-based perinatal outcome study. In: British Journal of Cancer. 2019.
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abstract = "Chemotherapy during a viable pregnancy may be associated with adverse perinatal outcomes. We conducted a prospective cohort study to examine the perinatal outcomes of babies born following in utero exposure to chemotherapy in Australia and New Zealand. Over 18 months we identified 24 births, of >400 g and/or >20-weeks' gestation, to women diagnosed with breast cancer in the first or second trimesters. Eighteen babies were exposed in utero to chemotherapy. Chemotherapy commenced at a median of 20 weeks gestation, for a mean duration of 10 weeks. Twelve exposed infants were born preterm with 11 by induced labour or pre-labour caesarean section. There were no perinatal deaths or congenital malformations. Our findings show that breast cancer diagnosed during mid-pregnancy is often treated with chemotherapy. Other than induced preterm births, there were no serious adverse perinatal outcomes.",
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In utero exposure to breast cancer treatment : a population-based perinatal outcome study. / Safi, Nadom; Anazodo, Antoinette; Dickinson, Jan E.; Lui, Kei; Wang, Alex Y.; Li, Zhuoyang; Sullivan, Elizabeth A.

In: British Journal of Cancer, 06.09.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

TY - JOUR

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T2 - a population-based perinatal outcome study

AU - Safi, Nadom

AU - Anazodo, Antoinette

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AU - Wang, Alex Y.

AU - Li, Zhuoyang

AU - Sullivan, Elizabeth A.

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AB - Chemotherapy during a viable pregnancy may be associated with adverse perinatal outcomes. We conducted a prospective cohort study to examine the perinatal outcomes of babies born following in utero exposure to chemotherapy in Australia and New Zealand. Over 18 months we identified 24 births, of >400 g and/or >20-weeks' gestation, to women diagnosed with breast cancer in the first or second trimesters. Eighteen babies were exposed in utero to chemotherapy. Chemotherapy commenced at a median of 20 weeks gestation, for a mean duration of 10 weeks. Twelve exposed infants were born preterm with 11 by induced labour or pre-labour caesarean section. There were no perinatal deaths or congenital malformations. Our findings show that breast cancer diagnosed during mid-pregnancy is often treated with chemotherapy. Other than induced preterm births, there were no serious adverse perinatal outcomes.

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