Improving pasteurized donor human milk for the preterm infant: opportunities for contemporary human milk banking

Charles Czank

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

301 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

[Truncated abstract] Human milk promotes optimal growth and wellbeing of the infant. Unfortunately, mothers own milk (MOM) is often not available for the preterm infant. In this instance, pasteurized donor human milk (PDHM) is a suitable alternative, however a number of issues are associated with its use and preparation. As the composition of human milk varies, the energy content of human milk is never constant. Consequently this prevents the accurate targeting of the nutritional needs of the preterm infant. Given that the fat content exhibits the greatest variation of the macronutrients and contributes approximately half of the energy content of human milk, standardizing this component would contribute to reducing the variation in energy content. A simple method was developed to achieve this outcome and it was possible to reduce the variation in the fat content of human milk from 19.3% to 2.6% (n=6). This method is accurate and can be used for individualized fortification of human milk with commercial human milk fortifiers (HMF). Pasteurization (62.5°C for 30 minutes) of human milk prevents the transfer of pathogens to the preterm infant but also denatures bioactive proteins of human milk. Under these conditions, the retention of secretory IgA (sIgA), lactoferrin and lysozyme was 72.3 ± 3.6%, 21.8 ± 3.3 % and 39.4 ± 11.5 % (n=22), respectively. In addition, the heating time required to heat the milk to the holding temperature affected the retention of lysozyme.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Publication statusUnpublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Improving pasteurized donor human milk for the preterm infant: opportunities for contemporary human milk banking'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this