Improved hypertension control with the imidazoline agonist moxonidine in a multinational metabolic syndrome population: Principal results of the mersy study

Irina Chazova, Markus P. Schlaich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was designed to assess the effects of moxonidine on blood pressure and aspects of the metabolic syndrome in racially diverse population of patients encountered in routine medical practice. Physicians collected data on a minimum of three consecutive patients with uncontrolled essential hypertension and criteria for metabolic syndrome, eligible to receive moxonidine (0.2-0.4 mg once daily) for 6 months, either as monotherapy or as adjunct therapy to current antihypertensive treatment. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) declined by an average of 24.5 + 14.3 mmHg and 12.6 + 9.1 mmHg, respectively. BP responder rates defined as attaining BP < 140/90 mmHg were significantly (P < 0.001) and substantially higher among younger patients, nonpostmenopausal women, and patients receiving monotherapy. While potentially relevant improvements in the entire cohort were observed in regard to body weight (- 2.1 ± 5.4 kg), fasting plasma glucose (from 6.8 to 6.2 mmol/L), and triglycerides (2.4 to 2.0 mmol/L), statistically significant changes in metabolic parameters could only be detected in subgroup analyses. Moxonidine therapy reduced blood pressure and improved rates of blood pressure control in this group of patients. While the observed trend towards improvement in various metabolic parameters merits further investigation, the overall effect of moxonidine treatment is consistent with a reduction of total cardiovascular risk in this hypertensive metabolic syndrome cohort.

Original languageEnglish
Article number541689
JournalInternational Journal of Hypertension
Volume2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Apr 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

moxonidine
Imidazolines
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Population
Therapeutics
Antihypertensive Agents

Cite this

@article{76f334fd7dfb447c88cc61b95221889f,
title = "Improved hypertension control with the imidazoline agonist moxonidine in a multinational metabolic syndrome population: Principal results of the mersy study",
abstract = "This study was designed to assess the effects of moxonidine on blood pressure and aspects of the metabolic syndrome in racially diverse population of patients encountered in routine medical practice. Physicians collected data on a minimum of three consecutive patients with uncontrolled essential hypertension and criteria for metabolic syndrome, eligible to receive moxonidine (0.2-0.4 mg once daily) for 6 months, either as monotherapy or as adjunct therapy to current antihypertensive treatment. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) declined by an average of 24.5 + 14.3 mmHg and 12.6 + 9.1 mmHg, respectively. BP responder rates defined as attaining BP < 140/90 mmHg were significantly (P < 0.001) and substantially higher among younger patients, nonpostmenopausal women, and patients receiving monotherapy. While potentially relevant improvements in the entire cohort were observed in regard to body weight (- 2.1 ± 5.4 kg), fasting plasma glucose (from 6.8 to 6.2 mmol/L), and triglycerides (2.4 to 2.0 mmol/L), statistically significant changes in metabolic parameters could only be detected in subgroup analyses. Moxonidine therapy reduced blood pressure and improved rates of blood pressure control in this group of patients. While the observed trend towards improvement in various metabolic parameters merits further investigation, the overall effect of moxonidine treatment is consistent with a reduction of total cardiovascular risk in this hypertensive metabolic syndrome cohort.",
author = "Irina Chazova and Schlaich, {Markus P.}",
year = "2013",
month = "4",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1155/2013/541689",
language = "English",
volume = "2013",
journal = "International Journal of Hypertension",
issn = "2090-0384",
publisher = "Hindawi Publishing Corporation",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Improved hypertension control with the imidazoline agonist moxonidine in a multinational metabolic syndrome population

T2 - Principal results of the mersy study

AU - Chazova, Irina

AU - Schlaich, Markus P.

PY - 2013/4/2

Y1 - 2013/4/2

N2 - This study was designed to assess the effects of moxonidine on blood pressure and aspects of the metabolic syndrome in racially diverse population of patients encountered in routine medical practice. Physicians collected data on a minimum of three consecutive patients with uncontrolled essential hypertension and criteria for metabolic syndrome, eligible to receive moxonidine (0.2-0.4 mg once daily) for 6 months, either as monotherapy or as adjunct therapy to current antihypertensive treatment. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) declined by an average of 24.5 + 14.3 mmHg and 12.6 + 9.1 mmHg, respectively. BP responder rates defined as attaining BP < 140/90 mmHg were significantly (P < 0.001) and substantially higher among younger patients, nonpostmenopausal women, and patients receiving monotherapy. While potentially relevant improvements in the entire cohort were observed in regard to body weight (- 2.1 ± 5.4 kg), fasting plasma glucose (from 6.8 to 6.2 mmol/L), and triglycerides (2.4 to 2.0 mmol/L), statistically significant changes in metabolic parameters could only be detected in subgroup analyses. Moxonidine therapy reduced blood pressure and improved rates of blood pressure control in this group of patients. While the observed trend towards improvement in various metabolic parameters merits further investigation, the overall effect of moxonidine treatment is consistent with a reduction of total cardiovascular risk in this hypertensive metabolic syndrome cohort.

AB - This study was designed to assess the effects of moxonidine on blood pressure and aspects of the metabolic syndrome in racially diverse population of patients encountered in routine medical practice. Physicians collected data on a minimum of three consecutive patients with uncontrolled essential hypertension and criteria for metabolic syndrome, eligible to receive moxonidine (0.2-0.4 mg once daily) for 6 months, either as monotherapy or as adjunct therapy to current antihypertensive treatment. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) declined by an average of 24.5 + 14.3 mmHg and 12.6 + 9.1 mmHg, respectively. BP responder rates defined as attaining BP < 140/90 mmHg were significantly (P < 0.001) and substantially higher among younger patients, nonpostmenopausal women, and patients receiving monotherapy. While potentially relevant improvements in the entire cohort were observed in regard to body weight (- 2.1 ± 5.4 kg), fasting plasma glucose (from 6.8 to 6.2 mmol/L), and triglycerides (2.4 to 2.0 mmol/L), statistically significant changes in metabolic parameters could only be detected in subgroup analyses. Moxonidine therapy reduced blood pressure and improved rates of blood pressure control in this group of patients. While the observed trend towards improvement in various metabolic parameters merits further investigation, the overall effect of moxonidine treatment is consistent with a reduction of total cardiovascular risk in this hypertensive metabolic syndrome cohort.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84875448511&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1155/2013/541689

DO - 10.1155/2013/541689

M3 - Article

VL - 2013

JO - International Journal of Hypertension

JF - International Journal of Hypertension

SN - 2090-0384

M1 - 541689

ER -