Implications for wind management in ecological restoration, linking ecosystem aerodynamics to physiological drivers in arid and semi-arid systems

Erica David

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

88 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Ecological restoration is currently positioned as a global priority, and while wind is an important ecological factor, its inclusion in restoration science and practice remains limited. This study investigated wind in the context of restoration, comparing canopy flow in Australian vegetation, and in post-mine restoration sites. Results indicate wind speed decreased as structural complexity of vegetation increased. Additionally, exposing Banksia attenuata seedlings to high wind speeds detrimentally affected growth and morphology, yet ecophysiological mechanisms remain unresolved. Continued research investigating mechanistic underpinnings of wind as an ecological factor is warranted to inform best practice in restoration of semi-arid systems.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Stevens, Jason, Supervisor
  • Veneklaas, Erik, Supervisor
  • Ghisalberti, Marco, Supervisor
  • Guzzomi, Andrew, Supervisor
  • Tomlinson, Sean , Supervisor, External person
  • Dixon, Kingsley, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date11 Oct 2022
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2022

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