Impaired memory updating associated with impaired recall of negative words in dysphoric rumination—Evidence for a removal deficit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
54 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

We present evidence that dysphoric rumination involves a working memory (WM) updating deficit. Sixty-one undergraduates—pre-screened with rumination and depression scales—completed a novel task providing a specific measure of WM updating. This task involved the substitution of emotionally-valenced words, and provided an online measure of the time taken to remove outdated items from WM. Results showed that dysphoric ruminators spent less time removing outdated words from WM when the new to-be-remembered word was negative. This effect was (1) associated with impaired subsequent recall of negative words, arguably caused by interference from the insufficiently removed outdated words; and (2) correlated with participants’ rumination scores. This is the first study to use the novel removal task to investigate the nature of WM-updating impairments in rumination. The findings are consistent with a negative attentional bias in rumination, and provide preliminary evidence that rumination is associated with a valence-generic removal deficit during WM updating. Reducing the attentional bias could thus be an intervention target in the treatment of dysphoric rumination.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-28
Number of pages7
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume93
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2017

Fingerprint

Short-Term Memory
Memory Disorders
Rumination
Working Memory
Depression

Cite this

@article{4333d33893754213a2c5a8dff737fea3,
title = "Impaired memory updating associated with impaired recall of negative words in dysphoric rumination—Evidence for a removal deficit",
abstract = "We present evidence that dysphoric rumination involves a working memory (WM) updating deficit. Sixty-one undergraduates—pre-screened with rumination and depression scales—completed a novel task providing a specific measure of WM updating. This task involved the substitution of emotionally-valenced words, and provided an online measure of the time taken to remove outdated items from WM. Results showed that dysphoric ruminators spent less time removing outdated words from WM when the new to-be-remembered word was negative. This effect was (1) associated with impaired subsequent recall of negative words, arguably caused by interference from the insufficiently removed outdated words; and (2) correlated with participants’ rumination scores. This is the first study to use the novel removal task to investigate the nature of WM-updating impairments in rumination. The findings are consistent with a negative attentional bias in rumination, and provide preliminary evidence that rumination is associated with a valence-generic removal deficit during WM updating. Reducing the attentional bias could thus be an intervention target in the treatment of dysphoric rumination.",
keywords = "Depression, Dysphoria, Executive function, Memory updating, Rumination, Working memory",
author = "Chang, {Ee Pin} and Ecker, {Ullrich K H} and Page, {Andrew C.}",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.brat.2017.03.008",
language = "English",
volume = "93",
pages = "22--28",
journal = "Behaviour Research & Thearpy",
issn = "0005-7967",
publisher = "Pergamon",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impaired memory updating associated with impaired recall of negative words in dysphoric rumination—Evidence for a removal deficit

AU - Chang, Ee Pin

AU - Ecker, Ullrich K H

AU - Page, Andrew C.

PY - 2017/6/1

Y1 - 2017/6/1

N2 - We present evidence that dysphoric rumination involves a working memory (WM) updating deficit. Sixty-one undergraduates—pre-screened with rumination and depression scales—completed a novel task providing a specific measure of WM updating. This task involved the substitution of emotionally-valenced words, and provided an online measure of the time taken to remove outdated items from WM. Results showed that dysphoric ruminators spent less time removing outdated words from WM when the new to-be-remembered word was negative. This effect was (1) associated with impaired subsequent recall of negative words, arguably caused by interference from the insufficiently removed outdated words; and (2) correlated with participants’ rumination scores. This is the first study to use the novel removal task to investigate the nature of WM-updating impairments in rumination. The findings are consistent with a negative attentional bias in rumination, and provide preliminary evidence that rumination is associated with a valence-generic removal deficit during WM updating. Reducing the attentional bias could thus be an intervention target in the treatment of dysphoric rumination.

AB - We present evidence that dysphoric rumination involves a working memory (WM) updating deficit. Sixty-one undergraduates—pre-screened with rumination and depression scales—completed a novel task providing a specific measure of WM updating. This task involved the substitution of emotionally-valenced words, and provided an online measure of the time taken to remove outdated items from WM. Results showed that dysphoric ruminators spent less time removing outdated words from WM when the new to-be-remembered word was negative. This effect was (1) associated with impaired subsequent recall of negative words, arguably caused by interference from the insufficiently removed outdated words; and (2) correlated with participants’ rumination scores. This is the first study to use the novel removal task to investigate the nature of WM-updating impairments in rumination. The findings are consistent with a negative attentional bias in rumination, and provide preliminary evidence that rumination is associated with a valence-generic removal deficit during WM updating. Reducing the attentional bias could thus be an intervention target in the treatment of dysphoric rumination.

KW - Depression

KW - Dysphoria

KW - Executive function

KW - Memory updating

KW - Rumination

KW - Working memory

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85016008732&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.brat.2017.03.008

DO - 10.1016/j.brat.2017.03.008

M3 - Article

VL - 93

SP - 22

EP - 28

JO - Behaviour Research & Thearpy

JF - Behaviour Research & Thearpy

SN - 0005-7967

ER -