Impaired calcium handling and mitochondrial metabolic dysfunction as early markers of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary myocardial disorder, characterised by myocyte remodeling, disorganisation of sarcomeric proteins, impaired energy metabolism and altered cardiac contractility. Gene mutations encoding cardiac contractile proteins account for 60% of HCM aetiology. Current drug therapy, including L-type calcium channel antagonists, are used to manage symptoms in patients with overt HCM, but no treatment exists that can reverse or prevent the cardiomyopathy. Design of effective drug therapy will require a clear understanding of the early pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease. Numerous studies have investigated specific aspects of HCM pathophysiology. This review brings these findings together, in order to develop a holistic understanding of the early pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease. We focus on gene mutations in cardiac myosin binding protein-C, β-cardiac myosin heavy chain, cardiac troponin I, and cardiac troponin T, that comprise the majority of all HCM sarcomeric gene mutations. We find that although some similarities exist, each mutation leads to mutation-specific alterations in calcium handling, myofilament calcium sensitivity and mitochondrial metabolic function. This may contribute to the observed clinical phenotypic variability in sarcomeric-related HCM. An understanding of early mutation-specific mechanisms of the disease may provide useful markers of disease progression, and inform therapeutic design.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)166-174
Number of pages9
JournalArchives of Biochemistry and Biophysics
Volume665
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Apr 2019

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Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy
Cardiac Myosins
Calcium
Drug therapy
Mutation
Genes
Contractile Proteins
L-Type Calcium Channels
Troponin T
Gene encoding
Troponin I
Myosin Heavy Chains
Calcium Channel Blockers
Drug Therapy
Myofibrils
Cardiomyopathies
Muscle Cells
Energy Metabolism
Disease Progression
Proteins

Cite this

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title = "Impaired calcium handling and mitochondrial metabolic dysfunction as early markers of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy",
abstract = "Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary myocardial disorder, characterised by myocyte remodeling, disorganisation of sarcomeric proteins, impaired energy metabolism and altered cardiac contractility. Gene mutations encoding cardiac contractile proteins account for 60{\%} of HCM aetiology. Current drug therapy, including L-type calcium channel antagonists, are used to manage symptoms in patients with overt HCM, but no treatment exists that can reverse or prevent the cardiomyopathy. Design of effective drug therapy will require a clear understanding of the early pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease. Numerous studies have investigated specific aspects of HCM pathophysiology. This review brings these findings together, in order to develop a holistic understanding of the early pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease. We focus on gene mutations in cardiac myosin binding protein-C, β-cardiac myosin heavy chain, cardiac troponin I, and cardiac troponin T, that comprise the majority of all HCM sarcomeric gene mutations. We find that although some similarities exist, each mutation leads to mutation-specific alterations in calcium handling, myofilament calcium sensitivity and mitochondrial metabolic function. This may contribute to the observed clinical phenotypic variability in sarcomeric-related HCM. An understanding of early mutation-specific mechanisms of the disease may provide useful markers of disease progression, and inform therapeutic design.",
keywords = "Calcium, Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Metabolism, Mitochondria, Myofilament calcium",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Impaired calcium handling and mitochondrial metabolic dysfunction as early markers of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

AU - Viola, Helena M.

AU - Hool, Livia C.

PY - 2019/4/15

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N2 - Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary myocardial disorder, characterised by myocyte remodeling, disorganisation of sarcomeric proteins, impaired energy metabolism and altered cardiac contractility. Gene mutations encoding cardiac contractile proteins account for 60% of HCM aetiology. Current drug therapy, including L-type calcium channel antagonists, are used to manage symptoms in patients with overt HCM, but no treatment exists that can reverse or prevent the cardiomyopathy. Design of effective drug therapy will require a clear understanding of the early pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease. Numerous studies have investigated specific aspects of HCM pathophysiology. This review brings these findings together, in order to develop a holistic understanding of the early pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease. We focus on gene mutations in cardiac myosin binding protein-C, β-cardiac myosin heavy chain, cardiac troponin I, and cardiac troponin T, that comprise the majority of all HCM sarcomeric gene mutations. We find that although some similarities exist, each mutation leads to mutation-specific alterations in calcium handling, myofilament calcium sensitivity and mitochondrial metabolic function. This may contribute to the observed clinical phenotypic variability in sarcomeric-related HCM. An understanding of early mutation-specific mechanisms of the disease may provide useful markers of disease progression, and inform therapeutic design.

AB - Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary myocardial disorder, characterised by myocyte remodeling, disorganisation of sarcomeric proteins, impaired energy metabolism and altered cardiac contractility. Gene mutations encoding cardiac contractile proteins account for 60% of HCM aetiology. Current drug therapy, including L-type calcium channel antagonists, are used to manage symptoms in patients with overt HCM, but no treatment exists that can reverse or prevent the cardiomyopathy. Design of effective drug therapy will require a clear understanding of the early pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease. Numerous studies have investigated specific aspects of HCM pathophysiology. This review brings these findings together, in order to develop a holistic understanding of the early pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease. We focus on gene mutations in cardiac myosin binding protein-C, β-cardiac myosin heavy chain, cardiac troponin I, and cardiac troponin T, that comprise the majority of all HCM sarcomeric gene mutations. We find that although some similarities exist, each mutation leads to mutation-specific alterations in calcium handling, myofilament calcium sensitivity and mitochondrial metabolic function. This may contribute to the observed clinical phenotypic variability in sarcomeric-related HCM. An understanding of early mutation-specific mechanisms of the disease may provide useful markers of disease progression, and inform therapeutic design.

KW - Calcium

KW - Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

KW - Metabolism

KW - Mitochondria

KW - Myofilament calcium

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DO - 10.1016/j.abb.2019.03.006

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JO - Archives of Biochem and Biophysics

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