Impact of waste-derived organic and inorganic amendments on the mobility and bioavailability of arsenic and cadmium in alkaline and acid soils

Claudia Rocco, Balaji Seshadri, Paola Adamo, Nanthi S. Bolan, Kenneth Mbene, Ravi Naidu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In agriculture, more and more frequently waste-derived amendments are applied to soil to improve physical and chemical properties. Nevertheless, in soils polluted by potentially toxic metal(loid)s, this agricultural practice may significantly affect the mobility and bioavailability of pollutants modifying the risks for biota and human health. This work was aimed to assess the influence of poultry manure, biochar and coal fly ash on the mobility and bioavailability of As and Cd spiked in two Australian soils with different pH and texture: Mount Gambier (MGB)-alkaline sandy clay loam and Kapuda (KPD)-acid loamy sand. After 4 weeks of incubation from spiking and another 4 weeks from amendment addition, the soils were analysed for pH and amounts of As and Cd in pore-water and following 1 M NH4NO3 extraction. Bioavailable amounts were assessed by plant uptake, using Zea mays L. as test crop. In the alkaline MGB soil, the availability of Cd was reduced, while that of As increased. An opposite behaviour was observed in the acid KPD soil. All amendments, when added to KPD soil, increased pH and consequently reduced the mobility of Cd and increased the mobility of As. In MGB, the amendment addition had an effect only on As mobility and bioavailability, which increased likely as a result of the increased competition for adsorption with DOC released by organic compounds. These trends were confirmed by the amounts of Cd and As uptaken by maize plants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25896-25905
Number of pages10
JournalEnvironmental Science and Pollution Research
Volume25
Issue number26
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sept 2018
Externally publishedYes

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