Impact of the introduction of drug eluting stents on clinical outcomes in patients undergoing percutaneous and surgical coronary artery revascularisation procedures in Western Australia

Frank Sanfilippo, J.M. Rankin, Michael Hobbs, M. Nguyen, Matthew Knuiman, P. Berg, E.G. Whitford, R. Hendriks, Bernard Hockings, M. Muhlmann, M. Newman, R. Larbalestier, I. Gilfillan, Tom Briffa

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Abstract

Background: Increasing rates of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and decreasing rates of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery followed the introduction of drug eluting stents in Western Australia in 2002. We assessed the impact of these changes on one-year outcomes for the total population of patients undergoing coronary artery revascularisation procedures (CARP) in Western Australia between 2000-2004.Methods: Clinical and linked administrative data (inpatient admissions and death) were merged for all patients who had their first CARP with stent or CABG in Western Australia between 2000-2004. The clinical data were collected from all hospitals in Western Australia where CARP procedures are performed. We calculated the unadjusted (Kaplan-Meier) and adjusted (Cox) risks for one-year death (all-cause), death (all-cause) or admission for myocardial infarction (MI), target vessel revascularisation (TVR) and the composite outcome of death/MI/TVR (major adverse cardiac events, MACE).Results: Over the study period, there were 14,118 index CARPs. The use of drug eluting stents increased from 0% to 95.8% of PCI procedures, and PCI procedures increased from 61.1% to 74.4% of all CARPS. There were no temporal changes in adjusted one-year mortality or death/MI. Overall, adjusted one-year MACE fell from 11.3% in 2000 to 8.5% in 2004 (p
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10pp
JournalBMC Cardiovascular Disorders
Volume13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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