Impact of substance use and other risk factor exposures on conviction rates by people with a psychotic illness and other mental disorders

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Abstract

Purpose: To examine the impact of substance use and other risk factors on conviction rates in people with a psychotic illness (PI) and other mental disorders (OMD) compared to those with no mental illness (NMI). Methods: This research is part of a longitudinal record-linked whole-population study of 467,945 children born in Western Australia (WA) between 1980 and 2001. This cohort was identified through linkages between the WA psychiatric case register, WA corrective services data and other state-wide registers. We assessed 184,147 individuals born during 1983–1991 to explore the impact of exposure to a variety of risk factors on conviction rates. Results: People with PI and OMD had higher conviction rates than those with NMI, with unadjusted incidence rate ratios (IRR) of 3.98 (95% CI 3.67–4.32) for PI and 3.18 (95% CI 3.03–3.34) for OMD. Adjusting for substance use reduced the rates by 60% in PI and 30% in OMD: IRRs 1.59 (95% CI 1.45–1.74) and 2.24 (2.12–2.37), respectively. Minimal change was seen when adjusting for other potential risk factors (including socio-demographics, victimisation and parental offending), with adjusted IRRs 1.58 (95% CI 1.43–1.74) for PI and 1.90 (95% CI 1.80–2.02) for OMD. Conclusions: Our analysis shows people with a mental illness have higher rates of conviction than those with NMI. Substance use has a major impact on this rate. Results suggest the need for a greater investment in programs addressing the issue of comorbid substance use with a view to reduce the rate of convictions in this population.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

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mental disorder
Mental Disorders
illness
mental illness
Western Australia
Crime Victims
victimization
Population
Psychiatry
incidence
Demography
Incidence
Research
insulin receptor-related receptor

Cite this

@article{314c05a9fe1b42e8b2e0f4ff40b91e0b,
title = "Impact of substance use and other risk factor exposures on conviction rates by people with a psychotic illness and other mental disorders",
abstract = "Purpose: To examine the impact of substance use and other risk factors on conviction rates in people with a psychotic illness (PI) and other mental disorders (OMD) compared to those with no mental illness (NMI). Methods: This research is part of a longitudinal record-linked whole-population study of 467,945 children born in Western Australia (WA) between 1980 and 2001. This cohort was identified through linkages between the WA psychiatric case register, WA corrective services data and other state-wide registers. We assessed 184,147 individuals born during 1983–1991 to explore the impact of exposure to a variety of risk factors on conviction rates. Results: People with PI and OMD had higher conviction rates than those with NMI, with unadjusted incidence rate ratios (IRR) of 3.98 (95{\%} CI 3.67–4.32) for PI and 3.18 (95{\%} CI 3.03–3.34) for OMD. Adjusting for substance use reduced the rates by 60{\%} in PI and 30{\%} in OMD: IRRs 1.59 (95{\%} CI 1.45–1.74) and 2.24 (2.12–2.37), respectively. Minimal change was seen when adjusting for other potential risk factors (including socio-demographics, victimisation and parental offending), with adjusted IRRs 1.58 (95{\%} CI 1.43–1.74) for PI and 1.90 (95{\%} CI 1.80–2.02) for OMD. Conclusions: Our analysis shows people with a mental illness have higher rates of conviction than those with NMI. Substance use has a major impact on this rate. Results suggest the need for a greater investment in programs addressing the issue of comorbid substance use with a view to reduce the rate of convictions in this population.",
keywords = "Childhood victimisation, Crime, Parental offending, Psychotic illness, Substance use",
author = "Valuri, {Giulietta M.} and Frank Morgan and Assen Jablensky and Ambrosi, {Taryn L.} and Morgan, {Vera A.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00127-019-01751-5",
language = "English",
journal = "Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology",
issn = "0933-7954",
publisher = "Springer Heidelberg",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of substance use and other risk factor exposures on conviction rates by people with a psychotic illness and other mental disorders

AU - Valuri, Giulietta M.

AU - Morgan, Frank

AU - Jablensky, Assen

AU - Ambrosi, Taryn L.

AU - Morgan, Vera A.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Purpose: To examine the impact of substance use and other risk factors on conviction rates in people with a psychotic illness (PI) and other mental disorders (OMD) compared to those with no mental illness (NMI). Methods: This research is part of a longitudinal record-linked whole-population study of 467,945 children born in Western Australia (WA) between 1980 and 2001. This cohort was identified through linkages between the WA psychiatric case register, WA corrective services data and other state-wide registers. We assessed 184,147 individuals born during 1983–1991 to explore the impact of exposure to a variety of risk factors on conviction rates. Results: People with PI and OMD had higher conviction rates than those with NMI, with unadjusted incidence rate ratios (IRR) of 3.98 (95% CI 3.67–4.32) for PI and 3.18 (95% CI 3.03–3.34) for OMD. Adjusting for substance use reduced the rates by 60% in PI and 30% in OMD: IRRs 1.59 (95% CI 1.45–1.74) and 2.24 (2.12–2.37), respectively. Minimal change was seen when adjusting for other potential risk factors (including socio-demographics, victimisation and parental offending), with adjusted IRRs 1.58 (95% CI 1.43–1.74) for PI and 1.90 (95% CI 1.80–2.02) for OMD. Conclusions: Our analysis shows people with a mental illness have higher rates of conviction than those with NMI. Substance use has a major impact on this rate. Results suggest the need for a greater investment in programs addressing the issue of comorbid substance use with a view to reduce the rate of convictions in this population.

AB - Purpose: To examine the impact of substance use and other risk factors on conviction rates in people with a psychotic illness (PI) and other mental disorders (OMD) compared to those with no mental illness (NMI). Methods: This research is part of a longitudinal record-linked whole-population study of 467,945 children born in Western Australia (WA) between 1980 and 2001. This cohort was identified through linkages between the WA psychiatric case register, WA corrective services data and other state-wide registers. We assessed 184,147 individuals born during 1983–1991 to explore the impact of exposure to a variety of risk factors on conviction rates. Results: People with PI and OMD had higher conviction rates than those with NMI, with unadjusted incidence rate ratios (IRR) of 3.98 (95% CI 3.67–4.32) for PI and 3.18 (95% CI 3.03–3.34) for OMD. Adjusting for substance use reduced the rates by 60% in PI and 30% in OMD: IRRs 1.59 (95% CI 1.45–1.74) and 2.24 (2.12–2.37), respectively. Minimal change was seen when adjusting for other potential risk factors (including socio-demographics, victimisation and parental offending), with adjusted IRRs 1.58 (95% CI 1.43–1.74) for PI and 1.90 (95% CI 1.80–2.02) for OMD. Conclusions: Our analysis shows people with a mental illness have higher rates of conviction than those with NMI. Substance use has a major impact on this rate. Results suggest the need for a greater investment in programs addressing the issue of comorbid substance use with a view to reduce the rate of convictions in this population.

KW - Childhood victimisation

KW - Crime

KW - Parental offending

KW - Psychotic illness

KW - Substance use

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85069499053&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00127-019-01751-5

DO - 10.1007/s00127-019-01751-5

M3 - Article

JO - Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology

JF - Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology

SN - 0933-7954

ER -