Impact of population ageing on growing demand for emergency transportation to emergency departments in Western Australia, 2005–2020

Patrick Aboagye-Sarfo, Qun Mai, Frank M. Sanfilippo, Daniel M. Fatovich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The aim of the present paper is to quantify the impact of population ageing on demand for emergency transportation (ET) to EDs in Western Australia (WA). Methods: A population-based longitudinal study using the statewide ED presentation data from 2005–2014 was used to predict ET demand in 2020, stratified by age group and sex. Results: From 2005 to 2014, 14.9% of all ED presentations arrived by ET. The number rose from 94 369 (13.9%) in 2005 to 153 374 (15.5%) in 2014, a compound annual growth of 5.5%. Of those presentations, 55.2% resulted in hospital admission. The proportion was higher in older age groups (64.5% in 65–74 years, 67.1% in 75–84 years and 68.4% in ≥85 years). Of ED presentations arriving by ET in age group ≥65 years, 70.9% were Australasian Triage Scale category 1, 2 or 3. The rate of ET per 1000 population increased in all age groups and sex. The highest growth was in the older age groups: from 86.6, 187.0 and 512.1 in ages 65–74 years, 75–84 years and ≥85 years, respectively, in 2005 to 102.5, 226.7 and 613.6 in 2014, and are expected to increase to 115.1, 264.3 and 707.7 by 2020. The ET demands in these age groups were projected to increase annually by 5.0%, 3.6% and 4.9%, respectively, in the next 6 years, comparing to less than 4.5% in the younger age groups. Conclusion: There has been a continuous rise in ET demand in WA, particularly in older people who have a higher urgency and requirement for admission.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)551-557
Number of pages7
JournalEMA - Emergency Medicine Australasia
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2016

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