Impact of environmental conditions on the infection behaviour of Western Australian strains of Plasmopara viticola, causal agent of downy mildew in grapevines

Mia Williams

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    931 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Downy mildew, caused by the biotrophic Oomycete Plasmopara viticola, is one of the most important diseases of grapevines world wide. It is particularly destructive in temperate viticultural regions that experience warm wet conditions during the vegetative growth of the vine (Wong et al., 2001). The disease is not normally a problem in mediterranean climates where the growing season tends to be hot and dry (Mullins et al., 1992; Sivasithamparam, 1993). Grape downy mildew is however a major disease in Australian viticulture (McLean et al., 1984; Magarey et al., 1991). Grape downy mildew was first reported in Europe in 1878 (Viennot-Bourgin, 1981). In Australia, it was recorded for the first time in 1917 at Rutherglen in Victoria (Vic) (de Castella, 1917). The first recorded outbreak of the disease in Western Australia (WA) occurred in 1997 in a small planting of vines in the far north of the state. In the subsequent year, it was detected in widespread commercial viticulture in the Swan Valley production area, near Perth (McKirdy et al., 1999). The pathogen has since been found in all grape growing regions of WA. Since its introduction into European vineyards in the 1880?s, P. viticola has become one of the world?s most investigated grapevine pathogens. Many aspects its basic biology however remain unknown (Wong et al., 2001).
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2005

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Impact of environmental conditions on the infection behaviour of Western Australian strains of Plasmopara viticola, causal agent of downy mildew in grapevines'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this