Immunomodulation of Tumor Vessels: It Takes Two to Tango

Anna Johansson-Percival, Bo He, Ruth Ganss

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The density of intratumoral CD8+ T cells predicts patient survival and responsiveness to immunotherapy. Effector T cell infiltration in turn is controlled by the tumor vasculature which co-evolves together with an immune-suppressive environment. At the T cell–vascular interface, endothelial cells actively suppress T cell trafficking and function. Conversely, forced activation, normalization, and differentiation of tumor vessels into high endothelial venule entrance portals for lymphocytes can facilitate T cell extravasation. Emerging evidence demonstrates that this process is not exclusively controlled by the endothelium. Indeed, tumor vasculature and CD4+ and/or CD8+ T cells may regulate each other: increasing local effector T cell numbers or re-invigorating pre-existing T cells via immune checkpoint blockade can directly affect the vasculature. A deeper understanding of the orchestration and duration of this reciprocal relationship may help shape the design of future immunotherapies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)801-814
Number of pages14
JournalTrends in Immunology
Volume39
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018

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Immunomodulation
T-Lymphocytes
Neoplasms
Immunotherapy
Venules
Endothelium
Endothelial Cells
Cell Count
Lymphocytes
Survival

Cite this

Johansson-Percival, Anna ; He, Bo ; Ganss, Ruth. / Immunomodulation of Tumor Vessels : It Takes Two to Tango. In: Trends in Immunology. 2018 ; Vol. 39, No. 10. pp. 801-814.
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Immunomodulation of Tumor Vessels : It Takes Two to Tango. / Johansson-Percival, Anna; He, Bo; Ganss, Ruth.

In: Trends in Immunology, Vol. 39, No. 10, 01.10.2018, p. 801-814.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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