Immigrants' Language Skills and Visa Category

B.R. Chiswick, Y.L. Lee, Paul Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article is concerned with the determinants of English language proficiency among immigrants in a longitudinal survey for Australia. It focuses on both visa category and variables derived from an economic model of the determinants of destination-language proficiency among immigrants. Skills-tested and economic immigrants have the greatest proficiency shortly after immigration, followed by family-based visa recipients, with refugees having the lowest proficiency. Other variables the same, these differences disappear by 3.5 years after immigration for speaking skills; and although they diminish, they persist longer for reading and writing skills. The variables generated from the model of destination-language proficiency (such as schooling and age at migration) are, in part, predictions of visa category, but they are more important statistically for explaining proficiency.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)419-450
JournalInternational Migration Review
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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immigrant
immigration
language
determinants
economic model
refugee
English language
speaking
recipient
migration
economics
Immigrants
Immigrant Languages
Language Proficiency
Language Skills
Proficiency
Immigration
Refugees
Recipient
Schooling

Cite this

Chiswick, B.R. ; Lee, Y.L. ; Miller, Paul. / Immigrants' Language Skills and Visa Category. In: International Migration Review. 2006 ; Vol. 40, No. 2. pp. 419-450.
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Immigrants' Language Skills and Visa Category. / Chiswick, B.R.; Lee, Y.L.; Miller, Paul.

In: International Migration Review, Vol. 40, No. 2, 2006, p. 419-450.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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