If at first...exploring the impact of retaking cognitive ability, situational judgement, and personality tests in a high-stakes personnel selection scenario

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

[Truncated abstract] The increasing use of psychometric assessments in personnel selection means that more job applicants are becoming test-sophisticated whereas others still are test-naive. Repeat exposure may, however, provide unfair advantage to those with prior exposure to tests whilst simultaneously affecting test validity. This thesis examines the effect of repeat exposure to psychometric assessment in a high-stakes personnel selection context; specifically in the context of repeated rejection for the same position. In a series of four studies, changes in performance are examined for tests of cognitive abilities and assessments of behavioural preference. For the former, where answers that applicants can provide are objectively correct or incorrect, the issues of changes in performance are relatively straightforward. For the latter, the opportunity exists for impression management and hence applicants might employ a variety of strategies to improve their chances of selection. Consideration is also given as to how ‘fakers’ may be distinguished from 'honest' responders. In the first study, the impact of repeated exposure to different tests of ability (numerical computation, mechanical comprehension, abstract reasoning, and teamwork skills) is considered. Results revealed that repeat applicants generally do perform better on cognitive tests, though the size of improvement varied with the type of test. After the second exposure, however, the improvements in performance begin to asymptote, suggesting that the benefits of prior test exposure are not cumulative.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Publication statusUnpublished - 2011

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personnel selection
personality test
cognitive ability
scenario
applicant
psychometrics
performance
teamwork
comprehension

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@phdthesis{9da8a83de32948f1bd476855c5aacda2,
title = "If at first...exploring the impact of retaking cognitive ability, situational judgement, and personality tests in a high-stakes personnel selection scenario",
abstract = "[Truncated abstract] The increasing use of psychometric assessments in personnel selection means that more job applicants are becoming test-sophisticated whereas others still are test-naive. Repeat exposure may, however, provide unfair advantage to those with prior exposure to tests whilst simultaneously affecting test validity. This thesis examines the effect of repeat exposure to psychometric assessment in a high-stakes personnel selection context; specifically in the context of repeated rejection for the same position. In a series of four studies, changes in performance are examined for tests of cognitive abilities and assessments of behavioural preference. For the former, where answers that applicants can provide are objectively correct or incorrect, the issues of changes in performance are relatively straightforward. For the latter, the opportunity exists for impression management and hence applicants might employ a variety of strategies to improve their chances of selection. Consideration is also given as to how ‘fakers’ may be distinguished from 'honest' responders. In the first study, the impact of repeated exposure to different tests of ability (numerical computation, mechanical comprehension, abstract reasoning, and teamwork skills) is considered. Results revealed that repeat applicants generally do perform better on cognitive tests, though the size of improvement varied with the type of test. After the second exposure, however, the improvements in performance begin to asymptote, suggesting that the benefits of prior test exposure are not cumulative.",
keywords = "Retesting, Personality, Cognitive ability, Impression management, Faking, High-stakes, Personnel selection, Situational-judgment",
author = "Patrick Dunlop",
year = "2011",
language = "English",

}

TY - THES

T1 - If at first...exploring the impact of retaking cognitive ability, situational judgement, and personality tests in a high-stakes personnel selection scenario

AU - Dunlop, Patrick

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - [Truncated abstract] The increasing use of psychometric assessments in personnel selection means that more job applicants are becoming test-sophisticated whereas others still are test-naive. Repeat exposure may, however, provide unfair advantage to those with prior exposure to tests whilst simultaneously affecting test validity. This thesis examines the effect of repeat exposure to psychometric assessment in a high-stakes personnel selection context; specifically in the context of repeated rejection for the same position. In a series of four studies, changes in performance are examined for tests of cognitive abilities and assessments of behavioural preference. For the former, where answers that applicants can provide are objectively correct or incorrect, the issues of changes in performance are relatively straightforward. For the latter, the opportunity exists for impression management and hence applicants might employ a variety of strategies to improve their chances of selection. Consideration is also given as to how ‘fakers’ may be distinguished from 'honest' responders. In the first study, the impact of repeated exposure to different tests of ability (numerical computation, mechanical comprehension, abstract reasoning, and teamwork skills) is considered. Results revealed that repeat applicants generally do perform better on cognitive tests, though the size of improvement varied with the type of test. After the second exposure, however, the improvements in performance begin to asymptote, suggesting that the benefits of prior test exposure are not cumulative.

AB - [Truncated abstract] The increasing use of psychometric assessments in personnel selection means that more job applicants are becoming test-sophisticated whereas others still are test-naive. Repeat exposure may, however, provide unfair advantage to those with prior exposure to tests whilst simultaneously affecting test validity. This thesis examines the effect of repeat exposure to psychometric assessment in a high-stakes personnel selection context; specifically in the context of repeated rejection for the same position. In a series of four studies, changes in performance are examined for tests of cognitive abilities and assessments of behavioural preference. For the former, where answers that applicants can provide are objectively correct or incorrect, the issues of changes in performance are relatively straightforward. For the latter, the opportunity exists for impression management and hence applicants might employ a variety of strategies to improve their chances of selection. Consideration is also given as to how ‘fakers’ may be distinguished from 'honest' responders. In the first study, the impact of repeated exposure to different tests of ability (numerical computation, mechanical comprehension, abstract reasoning, and teamwork skills) is considered. Results revealed that repeat applicants generally do perform better on cognitive tests, though the size of improvement varied with the type of test. After the second exposure, however, the improvements in performance begin to asymptote, suggesting that the benefits of prior test exposure are not cumulative.

KW - Retesting

KW - Personality

KW - Cognitive ability

KW - Impression management

KW - Faking

KW - High-stakes

KW - Personnel selection

KW - Situational-judgment

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

ER -