Identifying value in the engineering enterprise

James Trevelyan, Bill Williams

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperChapter

Abstract

The investigation presented in this chapter was originally inspired by the authors’ observations of engineers in Australia, India, Pakistan, and Portugal that suggested the value aspect of their work was rarely addressed. This is somewhat surprising given that value creation lies at the core of any business and nearly all of the engineers observed were working for business enterprises. This initial observation led us to examine what turned out to be relatively sparse literature relating to engineering value, how the value of engineering work is perceived within the context of entrepreneurship and innovation research and how students are introduced to this in engineering education programs and entrepreneurship courses. We were led to conclude that the concept of value creation makes only a tenuous and indistinct appearance at the far periphery of engineering discourse. Given the critical importance of business investment for almost all engineering enterprises, it is surprising that the research literature is almost silent on this issue. In the study we identify ways that engineers create and protect value that are not usually mentioned in the innovation-centred approach typical of entrepreneurship research and education emanating from Schumpeter’s early twentieth century ideas that still shape business and economics today. We hypothesize that this lack of awareness of value creation by engineers may be associated with low success rates of major engineering capital expansion projects such as process plants, infrastructure construction, and defence equipment acquisitions. Furthermore, it could help to explain some of the everyday frustrations encountered by engineers, employers and investors in engineering enterprises and low rates of productivity improvement in developing countries.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe engineering-business nexus
Subtitle of host publicationSymbiosis, tension and co-evolution
EditorsS. Hyldgaard Christensen, B. Delahousse, C. Didier, M Meganck, M. Murphy
Place of PublicationCham
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Chapter14
Pages281-313
Volume32
ISBN (Electronic)9783319996363
ISBN (Print)9783319996356
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Publication series

NamePhilosophy of Engineering and Technology
PublisherSpringer
ISSN (Print)1879-7202
ISSN (Electronic)1879-7210

Fingerprint

Enterprise engineering
Engineers
Value creation
Entrepreneurship
Innovation
Business enterprise
Investors
Discourse
Business investment
Employers
Joseph Schumpeter
Entrepreneurship research
Value engineering
Entrepreneurship education
Productivity improvement
Economics
Engineering education
20th century
India
Developing countries

Cite this

Trevelyan, J., & Williams, B. (2019). Identifying value in the engineering enterprise. In S. Hyldgaard Christensen, B. Delahousse, C. Didier, M. Meganck, & M. Murphy (Eds.), The engineering-business nexus: Symbiosis, tension and co-evolution (Vol. 32, pp. 281-313). (Philosophy of Engineering and Technology). Cham: Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-99636-3_14
Trevelyan, James ; Williams, Bill. / Identifying value in the engineering enterprise. The engineering-business nexus: Symbiosis, tension and co-evolution. editor / S. Hyldgaard Christensen ; B. Delahousse ; C. Didier ; M Meganck ; M. Murphy. Vol. 32 Cham : Springer International Publishing, 2019. pp. 281-313 (Philosophy of Engineering and Technology).
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Trevelyan, J & Williams, B 2019, Identifying value in the engineering enterprise. in S Hyldgaard Christensen, B Delahousse, C Didier, M Meganck & M Murphy (eds), The engineering-business nexus: Symbiosis, tension and co-evolution. vol. 32, Philosophy of Engineering and Technology, Springer International Publishing, Cham, pp. 281-313. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-99636-3_14

Identifying value in the engineering enterprise. / Trevelyan, James; Williams, Bill.

The engineering-business nexus: Symbiosis, tension and co-evolution. ed. / S. Hyldgaard Christensen; B. Delahousse; C. Didier; M Meganck; M. Murphy. Vol. 32 Cham : Springer International Publishing, 2019. p. 281-313 (Philosophy of Engineering and Technology).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperChapter

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AB - The investigation presented in this chapter was originally inspired by the authors’ observations of engineers in Australia, India, Pakistan, and Portugal that suggested the value aspect of their work was rarely addressed. This is somewhat surprising given that value creation lies at the core of any business and nearly all of the engineers observed were working for business enterprises. This initial observation led us to examine what turned out to be relatively sparse literature relating to engineering value, how the value of engineering work is perceived within the context of entrepreneurship and innovation research and how students are introduced to this in engineering education programs and entrepreneurship courses. We were led to conclude that the concept of value creation makes only a tenuous and indistinct appearance at the far periphery of engineering discourse. Given the critical importance of business investment for almost all engineering enterprises, it is surprising that the research literature is almost silent on this issue. In the study we identify ways that engineers create and protect value that are not usually mentioned in the innovation-centred approach typical of entrepreneurship research and education emanating from Schumpeter’s early twentieth century ideas that still shape business and economics today. We hypothesize that this lack of awareness of value creation by engineers may be associated with low success rates of major engineering capital expansion projects such as process plants, infrastructure construction, and defence equipment acquisitions. Furthermore, it could help to explain some of the everyday frustrations encountered by engineers, employers and investors in engineering enterprises and low rates of productivity improvement in developing countries.

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M3 - Chapter

SN - 9783319996356

VL - 32

T3 - Philosophy of Engineering and Technology

SP - 281

EP - 313

BT - The engineering-business nexus

A2 - Hyldgaard Christensen, S.

A2 - Delahousse, B.

A2 - Didier, C.

A2 - Meganck, M

A2 - Murphy, M.

PB - Springer International Publishing

CY - Cham

ER -

Trevelyan J, Williams B. Identifying value in the engineering enterprise. In Hyldgaard Christensen S, Delahousse B, Didier C, Meganck M, Murphy M, editors, The engineering-business nexus: Symbiosis, tension and co-evolution. Vol. 32. Cham: Springer International Publishing. 2019. p. 281-313. (Philosophy of Engineering and Technology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-99636-3_14