Identification of the mechanisms of wild radish herbicide resistance to PSII inhibitors, auxinics, and AHAS inhibitors

Lincoln Jacob Shane Friesen

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    350 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    The objective of this Ph.D. research was to identify new and novel mechanisms of wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum L.) resistance to photosystem II (PSII) inhibitors, auxinics, and acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) inhibitors. PSIIinhibitor resistance was demonstrated to be target-site based, and conferred by a Ser264 to Gly substitution of the D1 protein. Auxinic resistance was associated with reduced herbicide translocation to the meristematic regions of resistant wild radish plants. Two new resistance mutations of wild radish AHAS were discovered, including one encoding the globally rare Asp376 to Glu substitution, and another encoding an Ala122 to Tyr substitution, which has never been identified or assessed for resistance in plants previously. Characterization of the frequency and distribution of AHAS resistance mutations in wild radish from the WA wheatbelt revealed that Glu376 was widespread, and that some mutations of AHAS are more common than others. Computer simulation was used to examine the molecular basis of resistance-endowing AHAS target-site mutations. Furthermore, through the computer-aided analysis, residues were identified with the potential to confer resistance upon substitution, but which have not previously been assessed for this possibility. Results from this Ph.D. research demonstrate that diverse, unrelated mechanisms of resistance to PSII inhibitors, auxinics, and AHAS inhibitors have evolved in wild radish of the WA wheatbelt, and that these mechanisms have accumulated in some populations.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2007

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