How to be fair in prioritizing support in the aftermath of disasters: Pakistan’s housing reconstruction challenges following the 2010 flood disaster

Steven Schilizzi, Muhammad Masood Azeem

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperChapter

Abstract

Following the disastrous 2010 floods, where almost one million homes were totally destroyed, Pakistan’s government has had to face $2 billion of reconstruction costs. With a given reconstruction budget, reducing households’ vulnerability to flooding generated difficult decisions, where a greater weight given to the poorest also meant achieving less total protection-a typical case of social equity vs. resource use efficiency. This study shows the hidden complexity of such decision-making when there is urgency in disaster relief. Surprisingly, it turns out that in resource-constrained situations typical of developing countries, the choice of equity or justice norms matter little for how to best use the available budget. The determining factor is the interplay of reconstruction costs with both the government’s and households’ available budgets.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNatural Hazards and Disaster Justice
Subtitle of host publicationChallenges for Australia and Its Neighbours
EditorsAnna Lukasiewicz, Claudia Baldwin
Place of PublicationSingapore
PublisherSpringer
Chapter8
Pages151-166
Number of pages16
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9789811504662
ISBN (Print)9789811504655
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

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